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> Abundant Use of the Word "Advert", ...in the SR4 core book.
Xavier Grimwand
post Nov 28 2005, 06:41 PM
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This is an odd question, perhaps. But I noticed ALL instances of the term advertisements were referred to as "adverts" in the SR4 book. This is, chiefly, a British term. So I wondered, how many developers are from the UK? I had assumed that the authors/editors/contributors were mostly Americans. Rather... that is until I read the word "advert" in various places. ;)

In America, they're called out fully as advertisements, or ads, for short.

As an American, certain British terms make me cringe, just as certain American terms make the British cringe. [ Like "anyways" ]

So, I guess my real question is, why did they use a British slang term when they could have just used the word that we all (English speakers) use: advertisements?
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PlatonicPimp
post Nov 28 2005, 06:47 PM
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'Cause Brit-speak is awesome!
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Valentinew
post Nov 28 2005, 06:59 PM
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My guess is that they were aiming at showing how the world keeps getting smaller. Eventually, we'll start sharing each other's slang & one term will win out over another. Maybe, in this world, advert won out over ad.

Think about it. I've heard the term "wonky" more in the last year---in mainstream media, in everyday conversation---than I did in the 10 years previous, excepting only the time I went over to London for a week.
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Xavier Grimwand
post Nov 28 2005, 07:18 PM
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QUOTE (Valentinew)
My guess is that they were aiming at showing how the world keeps getting smaller. Eventually, we'll start sharing each other's slang & one term will win out over another. Maybe, in this world, advert won out over ad.

Well, that might make sense when used in flavor text, and such. But I'm referring to actual usage in-line with the game rules.

I'm fairly sure it's used in both.
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Backgammon
post Nov 28 2005, 09:44 PM
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What, no one outside britain can use the term "advert"? He HAS to be british to want to use that term?
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blakkie
post Nov 28 2005, 10:32 PM
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QUOTE (Backgammon)
What, no one outside britain can use the term "advert"? He HAS to be british to want to use that term?

Yes.
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Aku
post Nov 28 2005, 10:40 PM
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practical reasoning: advertisment used too many times over ran the lettercount, however, saying ad ran it too short. Advert, however, managed to fill the allotted space.
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SL James
post Nov 28 2005, 10:41 PM
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That almost makes perfect sense.
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Adam
post Nov 29 2005, 01:20 AM
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QUOTE
So, I guess my real question is, why did they use a British slang term when they could have just used the word that we all (English speakers) use: advertisements?

I didn't know that British people weren't English speakers! ;-)

All uses [that is to say, all two of them ;)] of the word 'advert' are courtesy of Rob, who isn't British.
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Azralon
post Nov 29 2005, 06:36 AM
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Oh, snap.
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Feshy
post Nov 29 2005, 06:48 AM
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QUOTE (Adam)
QUOTE
So, I guess my real question is, why did they use a British slang term when they could have just used the word that we all (English speakers) use: advertisements?

I didn't know that British people weren't English speakers! ;-)

All uses [that is to say, all two of them ;)] of the word 'advert' are courtesy of Rob, who isn't British.

Closet british maybe?

Personally, I can easily understand a bit of british influence when writing. My old software coding group used to harass me during peer review because I used the british spellings of so many words (colour, behaviour, etc.)

Really, I just don't like American dictionaries, so I don't use them. Webster's dictionary was an attempt to separate english from "british english" by replacing 's's with 'z's and other such nonsense. The American Heritage dictionary tends to be... well, wrong. Just plain wrong; when it even has the word I'm looking for. The Oxford English Dictionary is the only one I trust (for english, at any rate.)

So as a result, much of my spelling is british. The rest of it is spelled wrong for ANY language :) (Note, it's just my spelling that tends towards british, not the slang or word choice. If you tell me a story about changing your trousers riding a lory, I've not a clue of what you speak)

Interestingly, PHP spell used on this site accepts colour, but not behaviour. Then again, it doesn't recognize "I'm."
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Dranem
post Nov 29 2005, 06:59 AM
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I find it interesting that none of you took in consideration any possible Canadian influences in writing the book. You want to see Advert used alot (outside of the UK), take a jaunter up to Vancouver.... Seattle and Vancouver are pretty darn close, in fact I've known people who live in BC to work in Seattle.
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Critias
post Nov 29 2005, 07:04 AM
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Right. How silly of us not to immediately think of Canada as a world-shaping, civilization-changing, global powerhouse. If "eh" was the next slang term to take the world by storm, we'd all point North and go "ah hah!" As it is, we'll not.

Canada is, like, half elven. Europeans think of them as American wannabes, Americans think of them as eurotrash wannabes. They're in between, tolerated by both and loved by neither. Blech.
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Oracle
post Nov 29 2005, 07:08 AM
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Actually most Europeans not living on small islands see the Canadians as the better Americans... ;)
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Dranem
post Nov 29 2005, 07:41 AM
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QUOTE
Europeans think of them as American wannabes, Americans think of them as eurotrash wannabes.


What kind of Yankee trash have you been following? The only time I hear that pompous crap is from our 'friendly neighbours' down south. (Unless you live in Toronto, Ontarians are the closest to american mindset than any other.)
The fact that most Americans know little more than whats beyond their own doorstep though is well known.

What is a fact though:
- Most Canadians still use the old Imperial Spelling. Those who don't are either too lazy, or own a Websters dictionary.
- There are more Canadians in the entertainment industry than most people realise. (leading me to believe that assimilation of cultures has some minor balance - if taken on a per capita level ;) )
- Americans have been known to sew Canadian flags on their lugguage when travelling abroad in order to be better greeted by foreigners. (This last fact more than proves that Europeans think much higher of us Canucks than they do the people you say we wanna be like)

Last of all, I never said that Canada is world-shaping civilization-changing.. merely pointed out that there was most likely Canadians in the writing/editing team - seeing how many people work cross-border in areas were cities between our two country meet.
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Critias
post Nov 29 2005, 07:58 AM
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Heehee.

That riled 'em up, good.

Heehee.
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Xavier Grimwand
post Nov 29 2005, 11:16 AM
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QUOTE
Feshy wrote:
Webster's dictionary was an attempt to separate english from "british english" by replacing 's's with 'z's and other such nonsense.

That's actually not correct at all.
Are spellings like 'privatize' and 'organize' Americanisms?
Answer: "No, not really. British spelling has always recognized the existence of variant spellings using the suffix -ize..."


QUOTE
Adam wrote:
I didn't know that British people weren't English speakers!

I'm not quite sure what you meant by that. I have definitely heard British speakers use the word advertisements. They do tend to pronounce it differently than Americans do, though.

British Pronunciation: ad-vert-iz-ments
American Pronunciation: ad-ver-tize-ments

QUOTE
Dranem wrote:
I find it interesting that none of you took in consideration any possible Canadian influences in writing the book. You want to see Advert used alot (outside of the UK), take a jaunter up to Vancouver.... Seattle and Vancouver are pretty darn close, in fact I've known people who live in BC to work in Seattle.

I didn't know that they used the word "advert" in Canada -- at all. This is probably the most convincing point for actual in-character usage that I've read (so far) in this thread.

Thanks.
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Ophis
post Nov 29 2005, 11:59 AM
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QUOTE (Oracle)
Actually most Europeans not living on small islands see the Canadians as the better Americans... ;)

Nope most of us on the small Island see them as the better americans to. Just don't listen to our politians.
And would the americans stop bitching about advert being used, we use it and it our damn language.
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Critias
post Nov 29 2005, 12:10 PM
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Right, because the thread starter was "bitching."
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Ophis
post Nov 29 2005, 12:55 PM
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Damn it I there is so much sarcasm round here I didn't think smileys were needed.
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Xavier Grimwand
post Nov 29 2005, 01:05 PM
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QUOTE (Ophis)
there is so much sarcasm round here I didn't think smileys were needed.

Heh. Smileys are always needed. ;)

And I think I might switch to your spelling of smileys over smilies. It's much less cumbersome.
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Grinder
post Nov 29 2005, 01:29 PM
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QUOTE (Critias)
Europeans think of them as American wannabes, Americans think of them as eurotrash wannabes. They're in between, tolerated by both and loved by neither. Blech.

At least they're still a monarchy. That's cool. :D
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BlackHat
post Nov 29 2005, 01:40 PM
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And the legal drinking age is 19... which is very convenient for Americans on border-states who are under-age.

Go Canada! You Rox0r!
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Oracle
post Nov 29 2005, 01:45 PM
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Pft! Just come and visit the paradise of alcoholism: Drinking age - 16 for beer and wine!!! Welcome to Germany!
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Azralon
post Nov 29 2005, 03:09 PM
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That's it, I'm tired of all of the fighting around here. I'm going to go tell my president that all of you have WMDs so he can launch another crusade in the name of world peace.
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