IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

3 Pages V   1 2 3 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Power Gaming, Power Gaming and Munchkinism issues
Prospero
post Dec 11 2003, 12:02 PM
Post #1


Illuminate of the New Dawn
**

Group: Dumpshocked
Posts: 317
Joined: 9-June 03
From: Seattle 'Plex, UCAS
Member No.: 4,700



So... this might be a volatile topic, but, hey, why not? What do you consider power gaming? What do you consider munchkinism? Are these things ever okay? For that matter, what is a "real roleplayer"?

The Character Creation system thread got me thinking about this. Yum Donuts (I believe... sorry if I'm wrong and sorry if I misrepresented what you said) had a really good distinction between the two (which I'd never thought about before): power gaming is using the numbers to make a character as good as possible. Munchkinism is doing that (perhaps on an even worse level) and then no roleplaying at all tacked on as an added bonus.

So what do people out there think about this stuff?

*duck and cover* :spin:
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Yum Donuts
post Dec 11 2003, 12:22 PM
Post #2


Moving Target
**

Group: Members
Posts: 228
Joined: 7-December 03
Member No.: 5,883



That's almost exactly what I meant.

I am a rules-bitch. I used to be able to cite page numbers from memory for rules, and I knew all the tricks and all the math to cram as much into a character as possible. And I would do just that, every now and then, for fun.
But I would never actually PLAY such a monstrosity. there's no fun in it without some kind of persona.
Take my gunslinger physmage, Tybalt. I got the idea from John Leguizamo's rendition of the role, and wanted something like it. so I came up with a story about the son of a mafioso who killed the heavily cybered son of a bigwig Yak (who everyone knew was a prick and was asking for it). to avoid a war, he had to be excluded from all family business, and could receive no aid. He could still come to birthdays, weddings and the like, but he had to be careful because if it became known on the streets who he was, it would cause all kinds of problems. He was also very vain, with a high charisma, and skills like fashion, and ballroom dancing.
So I made a character with a definite personality, an interresting backstory, a hidden secret and skills and abilities to give him a distinctive flair.
But you bet your ass that I made him awesome at gun slinging too, and that he could hold his own against any sammy. I counted every spell point, and every nuyen to make him exactly as powerful as I thought he should be. Let the GM worry about balancing me with the group, if I want my character to be good at something, he will be.

So you can call me a munchkin if you want, but I don't think "munchkin" has to be about the powerlevel of the character, I've seen several munchkins who sucked at number crunching at chargen. the point comes up whether you're playing a character, or playing a set of stats.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Cray74
post Dec 11 2003, 01:42 PM
Post #3


Running Target
***

Group: Members
Posts: 1,428
Joined: 9-June 02
Member No.: 2,860



QUOTE (Prospero)
So... this might be a volatile topic, but, hey, why not? What do you consider power gaming? What do you consider munchkinism? Are these things ever okay? For that matter, what is a "real roleplayer"?

The Character Creation system thread got me thinking about this. Yum Donuts (I believe... sorry if I'm wrong and sorry if I misrepresented what you said) had a really good distinction between the two (which I'd never thought about before): power gaming is using the numbers to make a character as good as possible. Munchkinism is doing that (perhaps on an even worse level) and then no roleplaying at all tacked on as an added bonus.

So what do people out there think about this stuff?

*duck and cover*  :spin:

I don't mind power gaming at all. Some of my most fun and best roleplaying has occurred in games where my character was powerful beyond the normal bounds of the game - a 5th generation, 1000-year old vampire with a corporate empire of nuclear power plants. Combat was limited, because I either fought trivial threats [1] or because getting into life-or-death fights with 'serious' opponents would involve extensive damage to corporate facilities. (Elders don't just brawl in the streets, they try to destroy their foes' possessions and wealth. I really didn't want to loose my corporate empire.) So it was all roleplaying, deal making, etc.

[1] Fun fight: a 'coterie' of high generation, young vampires showed up to 'thwart my evil schemes.' They were a bunch of NPCs being played like a PC gaming group - very amusing.

I've seen the same thing in DnD, where high level PCs just don't have many foes, but they do have noble titles, lands, etc. They're powerful enough to kill dragons on a whim ("Gee, guests are coming over next week...I think a stuffed 'n mounted red dragon head would look fetching in the great hall. I better go get one.")

Shadowrun's a bit more limited because it doesn't have the 'tools' like World of Darkness to reflect growing PC 'influence,' 'resources,' etc. All those details are less quantified and more dependent on GM judgment and roleplaying, which means a GM that isn't terribly familiar with city politics may make naive (or unduly harsh) decisions regarding a PC's ability to influence a metroplex legislator to, say, improve living conditions in the Barrens. With Backgrounds, a WoD character could roll his Influence (City Politics) at a GM-set target number.

While SR might not support that kind of power roleplaying, it's still fun to play a very potent SR PC. When you have a PC with the tools, skills, and/or spells, it's fun to sit back and reflect, "Damn, I'm playing an elite ninja commando badass." Sure, combat's quick and perfunctory most of the time, but that's the point of being elite, isn't it? You make difficult tasks look easy, and they might even be easy.

Munchkins, though. Munchkins are the power gamer without the interest in roleplaying. No fun there. And I agree with Yum Donuts: munchkins do not necessarily have good characters. They two key distinctions are an attempt to have a powerful character and the lack of interest in roleplaying.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Traks
post Dec 11 2003, 01:52 PM
Post #4


Moving Target
**

Group: Members
Posts: 226
Joined: 4-June 03
Member No.: 4,685



Looke like lately we have stumbled upon a horde of beaten dead horses, right? :)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Tziluthi
post Dec 11 2003, 02:58 PM
Post #5


Moving Target
**

Group: Members
Posts: 596
Joined: 18-February 03
Member No.: 4,112



I've always seen the difference between power-gaming (or min-maxing) and munchkinism to be: A min-maxer will sit down and, after looking at all the heavy pistols, will pick out an Ares Viper, then almost definately tack on a smartlink and all that. A munchkin will sit down with the CC weapon creation rules and create a pistol that puts the AVS to shame, and then proceed to cause havok way outside the scope of the story much to the annoyance of the GM, if not everybody esle in the group.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Yum Donuts
post Dec 11 2003, 03:42 PM
Post #6


Moving Target
**

Group: Members
Posts: 228
Joined: 7-December 03
Member No.: 5,883



QUOTE (Tziluthi)
I've always seen the difference between power-gaming (or min-maxing) and munchkinism to be: A min-maxer will sit down and, after looking at all the heavy pistols, will pick out an Ares Viper, then almost definately tack on a smartlink and all that. A munchkin will sit down with the CC weapon creation rules and create a pistol that puts the AVS to shame, and then proceed to cause havok way outside the scope of the story much to the annoyance of the GM, if not everybody esle in the group.

Nope, you still don't get it. My gunbunny would also be making the ultimate custom pistol from CC rules too. that's what the options are there fore, to be used. but whereas the munchkin would just design the gun he wants and then use it, the powergamer would design the gun they want, out of game, then spend in-game time and money to buy contacts to get estimates done about what could be done to a pistol and for how much (the character doesn't have Guns(B/R), so they wouldn't know how to design it themselves). the power gamer would then realize the balisitc implications that came with having a custom-made weapon, and try to minimize it's use for fear of it being tracked down.

As a power gamer, if I can get better gear, I will. but I will not sacrifice believability and roleplay for it, instead I will use them as the basis for it.

Maxing out the perfect pistol for your character using CC does not make you a munchkin any more than the desire to wear shoes that fit makes you a perfectionist. The rules are there for creating a gun, so the system must want it to be a possibility, and why not create the best gun you can?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Logo
post Dec 11 2003, 03:45 PM
Post #7


Target
*

Group: Members
Posts: 19
Joined: 11-December 03
Member No.: 5,893



What pisses me off is not getting the most for your nuyen, but making the character rediculous. When I GM, if I see something on a character that the owner can't come up with a passable reason for owning, I don't let them have it ("Where'd you get those Deltaware wired reflexes?" "A friend" "Sure..."). I try to mold my characters the same, as well. That's why my characters tend to go later in battle, because I don't have 20 reaction with 80d6 initiative :P

My latest character is my favorite example. He's effectively a punk, skates, spraypaint, dislike for authority, the works, but he's a little older than most punks. Since he's been doing anti-authority for so long, he's picked up a few items that help him out, like a tracheal (sp?) filter for all those nasty gas grenades, a knowledge of police tactics, and a some other useful anti-authority tools (jammers, etc.)

I make the character, then I make the stats, and I really think that's the way everyone should do it. After I have a rough character, I give them edges and flaws, and from there, the rest of their stats, equipment, and other things all seem to fall into place.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Reaver
post Dec 11 2003, 04:03 PM
Post #8


Moving Target
**

Group: Members
Posts: 518
Joined: 24-February 03
From: Tucson
Member No.: 4,153



Power gaming is only fun (IMHO) if you have started your character up from the ground floor. At least you have a complete background history of what the character went through... cause you were really there and did it.

As an example, the character I use in my stories orginally started out in 1st ed. SR as Paladin. The character was an exercise of what kind of character you would have if you took your own stats and translated them into SR, just like a post going on right now. Paladin had been through a LOT, and was developing some nasty enemies and decided to fake his own death to become Reaver. And the rest is history. Paladin/Reaver has had a lot of color in his background with the runs he has done and the groups he has been with. So, at a little over 1,000 shadow total (only 400 as Reaver), he is now a definite power gaming level character that requires nastier threats. The bonus is, he's a character that has a lot under his belt and some great roleplaying memories. :D
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ol' Scratch
post Dec 11 2003, 04:07 PM
Post #9


Immortal Elf
**********

Group: Validating
Posts: 7,999
Joined: 26-February 02
Member No.: 1,890



All three of these are completely different things. More than one can apply to a player or a situation, but they are still three different things.

Min-Maxing: Making wise decisions when designing your character so that you minimize your losses while gaining the maximum benefit in your chosen field. Good min-maxers make these decisions based upon their characters, while bad min-maxers make it a complete numbers game and make their decisions for purely metagaming reasons.

Power-Gaming: Setting character creation guidelines well above the normal limit and then focusing around playing at nearly insane levels. Scenarios like Survival of the Fittest are power-gaming scenarios. Creating characters that take on dragons, immortal elves, and megacorporate CEOs on a regular basis and winning is power-gaming.

Munchkinism: Typically comprised of newbies who either don't understand the rules or the game's concept, and who pick outrageous things just because they think it'll let them be anime-ish or whatever. Nine times out of ten, they have no concern about what the rules say and completely ignore them if they get in their way. They also tend to cheat during a game and whine if they have to take even the most mild of setbacks. They're also usually well out of sync power-wise with the rest of the group.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Dende
post Dec 11 2003, 04:25 PM
Post #10


Moving Target
**

Group: Members
Posts: 124
Joined: 21-November 03
Member No.: 5,837



Holy shit some of you seem confused...

Doc I love your definition of Power Gaming, right on.

Min-Maxing, I see as the beginning of Munchkinning, honestly, IMO I see min-maxing as someone picking a set of skills because those are going to be more useful, usually still within the system's normal bounds... IE a Starting troll with 9 or 10 STR

Whereas, I see Munchkinning as something NO NEWBIE could EVER do, on purpose. Munchkinning in my mind requires someone who knows how to fully exploit the rules to create characters that are unbalancing A LONG ways from the rest of the group. It is no longer about being a specialist...but being an UBER in some skill, usually only a few, though becuase they have put all their skills into only a few places. They plan characters out as being able to be the most powerful, for the cheapest possible cost... IE melee chars maxing the STR stat to put more points in katana for less cost so they can pump it higher, faster.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Reaver
post Dec 11 2003, 04:48 PM
Post #11


Moving Target
**

Group: Members
Posts: 518
Joined: 24-February 03
From: Tucson
Member No.: 4,153



QUOTE (Dende)
Holy shit some of you seem confused...

Doc I love your definition of Power Gaming, right on.

Min-Maxing, I see as the beginning of Munchkinning, honestly, IMO I see min-maxing as someone picking a set of skills because those are going to be more useful, usually still within the system's normal bounds... IE a Starting troll with 9 or 10 STR

Whereas, I see Munchkinning as something NO NEWBIE could EVER do, on purpose. Munchkinning in my mind requires someone who knows how to fully exploit the rules to create characters that are unbalancing A LONG ways from the rest of the group. It is no longer about being a specialist...but being an UBER in some skill, usually only a few, though becuase they have put all their skills into only a few places. They plan characters out as being able to be the most powerful, for the cheapest possible cost... IE melee chars maxing the STR stat to put more points in katana for less cost so they can pump it higher, faster.

I've seen newbies do munchkin just as much as those who do know the rules. I think both your definitions would be correct. :)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
CoalHeart
post Dec 11 2003, 05:06 PM
Post #12


Moving Target
**

Group: Members
Posts: 280
Joined: 22-October 03
Member No.: 5,757



It's not about powergaming or munchinining. It's all about having style and good roleplaying and interactions.

Let the noob or even the pro get every point they can out of thier character. Looking at how fatal shadowrun can be they'll need every point they can get. Just make sure they have a good personality too :)

Sure my character can punch a hole through a truck's engine block, powerlift 800 kilos, fly, deck, rig, and shoot.(all exagerations) Does it matter? No. Because it's just numbers on paper. You have to be able to play, and interact or there is no point in even calculating the cost of karma/yen needed to get the next best thing.

A munchkin is someone who gets the best they can on the sheet, and thats it... they just say thier dice rolling is thier roleplaying thusly ruining everyone elses fun. Rather lame in my book.

Power gaming is a frame of mind, somepeople feel no growth is a good thing. So they're complacent with where they are. A powergamer looks for advancement. Thats all fine and good as long as they behave as thier character would to get there. Very easy to fall into munchyness here.

So in the end I will summarize.

Munchkin = Player who only throws dice at something until it goes away.
Powergamer = Player who looks for the next thing to get more dice.
Munchkin Powergamer = Player who throws dice at something just to get more dice to throw more dice and so on ad infinitum.
Roleplaying Munchkin= Player who can not exist without causing a universal paradox.
Roleplaying Powergamer = Player who roleplays constantly with the goal of getting more dice at the end of it.
Standard gamer = Player who throws dice at problems that need dice thrown at it, who's goal is to get more dice eventually, but most importantly is there to have fun.

And yes, I had a herbal breakfast so my views are skewed.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
BitBasher
post Dec 11 2003, 05:12 PM
Post #13


Traumatizing players since 1992
******

Group: Dumpshocked
Posts: 3,282
Joined: 26-February 02
From: Las Vegas, NV
Member No.: 220



I also see min-maxing and munchkinizing as a function of the order of creation somewhat.

A player building a legitimate character knows what the character is like and how he plans to operate. He makes a background and all the groundwork, then buys cyberware and assigns attribs and skills to flesh out that character.

A player min-maxing or munching finishes all the stats first, working out what can cram in then shrink wraps a usually generic (corp experiment, military reject(Bonus lame points for punching out a commanding officer) or such) background around it in an attempt to come up with a reason the character has all that crap, usually not a good reason.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ol' Scratch
post Dec 11 2003, 05:23 PM
Post #14


Immortal Elf
**********

Group: Validating
Posts: 7,999
Joined: 26-February 02
Member No.: 1,890



I completely disagree. A munchkin or powergamer can often be a min-maxer, but a min-maxer need not be a munchkin or powergamer.

Everyone min-maxes. If you didn't, all your stats would be 3 and all of your skills (of which you would either have all of the ones available or none of them at all) would be at 3 as well. You would have no cyberware, as any cyberware would be chosen to give you an advantage at the cost of a hindrance, and that's min-maxing.

Min-maxing is simply making wise decisions for your character. Most people do it to build a specific character, while others do it just to see what the numbers can do. The former is a typical player (and some are better at making decisions than others; don't get me started on the "soldiers" created in a recent PbB board such as a weapon specialist with firearm skills of 2), while the latter tend to gravitate towards powergaming or munchkin land.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Lilt
post Dec 11 2003, 05:34 PM
Post #15


Shooting Target
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1,965
Joined: 26-February 02
From: Edinburgh, Scotland
Member No.: 2,032



I agree with Dr Funk's definitions. The boundareis are never quite clear-cut (munchkins will foreseeably min/max if they know how to)

Some sample actions from the various categories are:

Min/Maxing:
Puting high numbers in intelligence and quickness (trivial, but still technically min/maxing)
Calculating probabilities (again, trivial, but again min/maxing)
Using the firearms design rules to get a kickass home-made SOTA Pistol-sized AR. (less trivial)

PowerGaming
DR funk's examples are spot-on

Munchkinning:
Taking extra language skills for free as the char was brought-up in a bilingual family
Buying the intimidation skill based on your strength because you're so hard
Taking gear found on web sites without GM consent
Deliberately breaking the rules in a way that makes your character more powerful
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Dende
post Dec 11 2003, 05:57 PM
Post #16


Moving Target
**

Group: Members
Posts: 124
Joined: 21-November 03
Member No.: 5,837



Lilt and Dr Funk, I am sorry, but I have to totally disagree, most Munchkins in my experience aren't cheating at all. They haven't broken any rules...all they did was exploit the rules to make vastly "superior" characters in only 1 or 2 areas. They distance themselves from what is sane comparatively with the rest of the group...if everyone did it, then you have a powergame.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Fresno Bob
post Dec 11 2003, 06:03 PM
Post #17


Neophyte Runner
*****

Group: Members
Posts: 2,156
Joined: 15-March 03
From: Fresno, CalFree
Member No.: 4,252



What I don't get, is why everyone hates powerful characters. It seems every time someone makes a character that is for "Role, not ROLL, playing" (Why aren't there haughty accent tags?!), that character really....really...really sucks. Like...Quadraplegic Deaf Mages, or Blind Gay Trolls who have no combat skills whatsoever. Or something like that. Its like they think having a drekky (That doesn't sound right...whats the SR equivalent of shitty?) character is some sort of badge that makes them better than regular players, who make characters who are decent at something.

If you have a problem with Munchkins, do what I do. Take his character sheet. Copy it for an NPC. Give this NPC plus 2 to all stats, plus 3 to all skills, and more cyber/spells/guns/whatever. Make the Munchkin fight it. Alone, preferably.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Tanka
post Dec 11 2003, 06:11 PM
Post #18


Chrome to the Core
******

Group: Dumpshocked
Posts: 3,152
Joined: 14-October 03
From: ::1
Member No.: 5,715



QUOTE (Voorhees)
What I don't get, is why everyone hates powerful characters. It seems every time someone makes a character that is for "Role, not ROLL, playing" (Why aren't there haughty accent tags?!), that character really....really...really sucks. Like...Quadraplegic Deaf Mages, or Blind Gay Trolls who have no combat skills whatsoever. Or something like that. Its like they think having a drekky (That doesn't sound right...whats the SR equivalent of shitty?) character is some sort of badge that makes them better than regular players, who make characters who are decent at something.

If you have a problem with Munchkins, do what I do. Take his character sheet. Copy it for an NPC. Give this NPC plus 2 to all stats, plus 3 to all skills, and more cyber/spells/guns/whatever. Make the Munchkin fight it. Alone, preferably.

Actually, my GM-who-plays with a player-who-GMs has a Pacifist Snake Shaman. She (The character, the GM is male) has a skill in Whips, specifically a Monowhip. She's used it once, on a Spirit while in the Metaplanes.

Other than that, no Combat skills, per se. Just an intellect to get around combat, and is roleplayed quite well for being what some would consider sucky.

Oh, and I think it's actually "drekky," so you were right. At least, I've seen no other slang to say otherwise.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Jason Farlander
post Dec 11 2003, 06:11 PM
Post #19


Running Target
***

Group: Members
Posts: 1,049
Joined: 24-March 03
Member No.: 4,323



I've always thought of munchkinism as more of a mindset than a particular behavior set or playing style, though, of course, some playing styles and behaviors are rather common among munchkins. Munchkins are those players who are trying to *win* the game, and see all of the other players, as well as the GM, as opponents. They tend to not really care about how much fun anyone else is having.

I agree with Dr. F about powergaming, except for the fact that it doesn't have to involve altered chargen rules. Advanced campaigns can become powergames, as runners tend to get a little crazy with around 200 karma, and simply increasing the rate of karma acquisition can quickly lead to a rather powerful game.

As Dr. F. mentioned, everyone does some degree of min/maxing when they generate characters. Because of this, I use the term "min/maxer" to describe gamers who do this well beyond what is normal in roleplaying, who often go beyond "wise" desicions to generate characters who excel beyond reason in their chosen personal specialty, at the expense of not being able to do much else. Again, there is a degree of intent in what defines a min/maxer... not everyone who sets their charisma at 1 is a min/maxer, but the person who does so "because it doesnt factor into any combat abilities" almost certainly is.

Not all min/maxers are munchkins, though... even though their goal is to make the best character possible for whatever it is they want their character to excel in, this does not *always* mean that their goal in the game is to beat everone else. As such, as long as the player doesnt try to get in the way of anyone else's fun, I dont really mind the overly min/maxed characters. If playing with numbers in chargen is someones idea of the best part of roleplaying, well fine. Having fun is supposed to be the point, afterall.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
bwdemon
post Dec 11 2003, 06:22 PM
Post #20


Moving Target
**

Group: Members
Posts: 139
Joined: 26-February 02
From: Cleveland-Akron Sprawl
Member No.: 1,200



Powergaming: Extreme effectiveness within the boundaries of the campaign and utilizing only canon or balanced non-canon options.

Munchkin: Extreme effectiveness outside the boundaries of the campaign or utilizing unbalanced non-canon options.

Extreme effectiveness: Success, usually overwhelming success, is a given against *any* target in the chosen area that the character is likely to face in-game. Combat, spellcasting, decking, rigging, social skills... all of those can be powergamed or munchkin in scope.

Boundaries of the campaign: An archetype character armed with an LMG can be munchkin just as easily as a character with an undetectable rotary plasma death beam holdout pistol that doesn't need any ammo. The boundaries of the campaign determine the line between powergame and munchkin.

Balanced non-canon options: Spells, equipment, and other such things that have a cost (be it in karma, cash, or whatever) commensurate with their benefit and that are not accepted as canon in SR3.

Unbalanced non-canon options: See "undetectable rotary plasma death beam holdout pistol that doesn't need any ammo". Things that do not have a cost sufficient to balance the benefit(s) that they provide and are not accepted as canon in SR3.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Tanka
post Dec 11 2003, 06:23 PM
Post #21


Chrome to the Core
******

Group: Dumpshocked
Posts: 3,152
Joined: 14-October 03
From: ::1
Member No.: 5,715



OK, the most horrible munchkinism, I have to admit, comes from SR2. This was one of my first mishaps, even though I still like SR2 a bit more than SR3.

A Troll with a Body of something ridiculous (nearing 20, IIRC).
Skill of Firearms (Assault Rifles (HVAR)) 4(6(8))
Enhanced Articulation and a Reflex Recorder for Assault Rifles, thusly giving him, while using his HVAR, a Skill of 10 + Combat Pool (Which was 11, IIRC).

Oh, and did I mention that in SR2, a Customized Grip gave an extra die, and not RC1? Yeah, so 11 Dice using his HVAR, plus Combat Pool.

That one got put in jail kind of fast, though. He wasn't too keen on hiding his illegal stuff from the cops.

Never again. Oi.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Lilt
post Dec 11 2003, 06:37 PM
Post #22


Shooting Target
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1,965
Joined: 26-February 02
From: Edinburgh, Scotland
Member No.: 2,032



Dende: Disagreeing is fine. I'd just suggest that you consider what word you'd use for someone who invents new rules that make his or her character more powerful.

I'd call doing anything within the rules that makes characters more powerful Min/Maxing with varying degrees of severity. That extends all the way up-to completely absurd characters. I use the term "Bad Roleplayer" to describe someone who's character background was poor/carbon-copy/just plain stupid and the same to describe someone who Roll-Plays.

[edit]That definition was good: Munchkins are people who use unbalanced non-canon options[/edit]
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ol' Scratch
post Dec 11 2003, 06:42 PM
Post #23


Immortal Elf
**********

Group: Validating
Posts: 7,999
Joined: 26-February 02
Member No.: 1,890



Exactly.

The terms are just used to describe certain behaviors. The context of the terms vary; a min/maxer can be a good player with a good, solid character, or a min/maxer can be a munchkin powergamer with a Charisma of 1 'cause it interfers with his other cool powers and abilities. They're both still min/maxers as far as the term is concerned.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Sahandrian
post Dec 11 2003, 06:48 PM
Post #24


Moving Target
**

Group: Members
Posts: 475
Joined: 17-June 02
From: Concord University, Athens, WV
Member No.: 2,880



I think munchkin can be summed up in a single quote from one of my more infamous players...

During character creation on AIM:

Munchkin: Can I be an elven prince?
Me: What do you think?
Munchkin: yes!! ^_^ THANK YOU CHRIS!!
Me: ...No.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ol' Scratch
post Dec 11 2003, 06:49 PM
Post #25


Immortal Elf
**********

Group: Validating
Posts: 7,999
Joined: 26-February 02
Member No.: 1,890



The fact that he used the ^_^ emoticon is enough for me to want to smack him upside the head.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

3 Pages V   1 2 3 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 20th July 2024 - 06:29 AM

Topps, Inc has sole ownership of the names, logo, artwork, marks, photographs, sounds, audio, video and/or any proprietary material used in connection with the game Shadowrun. Topps, Inc has granted permission to the Dumpshock Forums to use such names, logos, artwork, marks and/or any proprietary materials for promotional and informational purposes on its website but does not endorse, and is not affiliated with the Dumpshock Forums in any official capacity whatsoever.