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> *POW* *KRAK*, What's your fave martial art?
Urba|\|inja
post Oct 21 2003, 01:25 AM
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Title says it all...

For me, you just can't compete with Capoeira. (aka "Spinny Tarzan Jujitsu" in the words of Sean William Scott :grinbig:)
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TinkerGnome
post Oct 21 2003, 01:26 AM
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Are you talking SR-wise or RL-wise? They're vastly different ;)
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Kagetenshi
post Oct 21 2003, 01:28 AM
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IRL, my favourite right now is my chosen style, Kenpo. That may or may not change as I learn other styles, but I somehow doubt it will.
In Shadowrun, Pentjak-Silat all the way.

~J
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Snow_Fox
post Oct 21 2003, 01:35 AM
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I did kenpo in college- very good for women.
I have a special fondness for aikido, even better for women since it uses balance and leverage more than force.
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Shadow
post Oct 21 2003, 01:38 AM
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The realist in me says Karate. Strait forward and incredibly powerful in the right hands. The cinamatic in me says Escrima, boy it looks so cool!
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Tziluthi
post Oct 21 2003, 01:41 AM
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Jujitsu's pretty good, but the SR rules are unfavourable to it. Tae Kwon Do looks interesting as a long form martial art, for the flying kicks if nothing else. Also breaking stuff with bare hands. That is Tae Kwon Do, right?
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Siege
post Oct 21 2003, 01:54 AM
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Yes, Tae Kwon Do does emphasize breaking techniques -- boards, rock and bones.

I suppose I don't have a "favorite" style as I subscribe to the "universal concept" theory.

That being said, I've studied Judo, Coung Nhu, Tae Kwon Do and a smattering of this and that.

I want to study Muay Thai and jujitsu provided I can find the time and money.

-Siege

Edit: Other styles do "break" techniques -- Karate is fond of breaking boards as a test of strength and so on. Tae Kwon Do is one of the few styles to have it incorporated as a philosophical approach -- the story being fighters had to be able to punch (or kick) through the wooden armor of the period. And the vast plains filled with horse-mounted warriors gave rise to the emphasis on the kicking techniques.

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Urba|\|inja
post Oct 21 2003, 01:58 AM
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No more Capoeira? :( Come on guys... think Eddy from Tekken! Breakdance fighting almost! :P
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Siege
post Oct 21 2003, 02:00 AM
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I've seen Brazilian Caepoeria (pardon the misspellings) and I also know that the rare school in or near Atlanta doesn't even come close.

The technique/style doesn't appeal to me as anything but an exercise form -- but that being said, I don't discount the effectiveness of a style that doesn't match my taste.

-Siege
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Munchkinslayer
post Oct 21 2003, 02:10 AM
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Jeek Kun Do (sp), developed by Bruce Lee is totally open ended. It can adopt whatever works from any style. Bruce Lee even studied fencing and used techniques he learned from that and translated them into his unarmed style. However just for shear brutallity Muay Thai gets my vote. Just freakin' nasty. For an armed style I'd go with Kali, even the "sports" version that uses sticks is viscious. Just think if they used knives.
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John Campbell
post Oct 21 2003, 02:27 AM
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Broadsword and shield. :D
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BitBasher
post Oct 21 2003, 02:30 AM
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RL? AKKI Kenpo. I love it.
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Seville
post Oct 21 2003, 02:37 AM
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I prefer airstrikes myself.
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k1tsune
post Oct 21 2003, 03:05 AM
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My only real experience is with Taekwando, with the occasional forray into something else when someone's around to teach me, but I'm decently experienced in that.
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FlakJacket
post Oct 21 2003, 03:47 AM
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QUOTE (Seville)
I prefer airstrikes myself.

Feh! Typical response from the Chair Force. :P I don't know, there's always just something really satisfying about artillery barrages in my opinion. That or MLRS in a pinch if there's nothing better. :D
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Dim Sum
post Oct 21 2003, 04:44 AM
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QUOTE (John Campbell)
Broadsword and shield. :D

Hahaha, sorry, I just found this hilarious inserted in here. Good one, Mister. Campbell. :P

As to favourite martial arts: in SR, I'd go with Pentjak Silat. IRL, goju-ryu works best for me as it's the most practical fighting form geared towards real life unarmed combat that I've personally learned.

I tried aikijitsu (the fighting form of aikido), taijitsu (the unarmed techniques of ninjitsu), wing chun, silat, and tae kwon do before settling on Goju-ryu. All of them didn't cut it for me because:

(a) the guys purporting to teach aikijitsu and taijitsu were full of crap - like real capoeira, it's almost impossible to find instructors in the real McCoy these days (hehehe, yeah, yeah, especially ninjitsu and all that jazz - hey, I was young and impressionable then! :D ).

(b) TKD is very good for sport but unless you're taught real life applications for it AND truly master it at its higher/highest levels, you're just going to get yourself killed thinking you can whoop ass with what you learn in class.

© wing chun is fast, fluid, and can be explosively elegant but it has too many trappings of tradition to make it an effective fighting form in real life unless you learn real life applications. I guess the event that really turned me off was when a whole bunch of kung fu exponents (including some top notch wing chun fighters) got their butts kicked in record time when they fought muay thai boxers during a no-holds barred tourney organised by the kung fu community in order to show the world that they were the best. :D

(d) pentjak silat in its true form (if you learn from a bomoh in Malaysia or Indonesia) is terrifying but I couldn't hack it 'cos it involved a lot of black magic (whether or not you believe in it) and that was something I was NOT about to mess around with.

For me, muay thai learned in Thailand, as opposed to kickboxing, is still the most effectivel martial art in the world today - I just don't have any desire or inclination to put myself through the brutal training regime to become good at it. Until I learn something else, [/I]goju[I] is a close second. :D

Anyway, I'm not dissing anyone or the martial arts they practise. Just adding my 0.02 nuyen worth.
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Siege
post Oct 21 2003, 04:49 AM
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Ya know, I think almost everyone has heard a version of the "kung-fu versus muay thai" story.

-Siege
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Dragoonkin
post Oct 21 2003, 04:59 AM
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I like Unarmed Combat. That's my favourite.
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Dim Sum
post Oct 21 2003, 05:20 AM
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QUOTE (Siege)
Ya know, I think almost everyone has heard a version of the "kung-fu versus muay thai" story.

-Siege

Hiya, Siege.

Yeah, I think that story made headlines in the martial arts community around the world. I was actually there for the first tournament but didn't bother to attend the second one (all the kung fu guys cried foul over the first one and demanded a re-match - same results). I grew up on kung fu and really thought highly of the art (in its various styles) till that first meeting with the muay thai fighters. I was in my early teens then so I hadn't seen anything like muay thai ... gawd, it was an eye-opener.

Years later, I still have a great deal for people who practise kung fu: my Dad did qi gong, my Mom did tai chi, and my brother did White Crane kung fu but when people ask me, I tell them that it's great for health and competition, not for real life situations.
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Siege
post Oct 21 2003, 05:28 AM
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I make reference of this because I heard something similar 10 years ago from a local competition.

I don't doubt the accuracy of the event -- for the same reason that most boxers win against karate students. Muay Thai is simple and half of the "martial art" is the physical training regimen. Which is lacking from a number of contemporary schools. (IMHO)

It reminds me of the urban legend of either:
a) robbers hitting a diner near the CIA, FBI and two other government agencies. Guess where a lot of agents went for lunch?

b) robbers who walk into a cop bar, owned by a former cop and frequented by a lot of off-duty cops.

I'm sure this has happened, but the story has taken on a life of it's own.

-Siege
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Kagetenshi
post Oct 21 2003, 05:36 AM
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On a side note, while I wouldn't recommend it for punches until much later, brick walls make great things to practice your kicks and palm-heel strikes against. Only problem is that you may feel a lot less effective than you actually are once you start hitting human targets...

~J
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Dim Sum
post Oct 21 2003, 05:46 AM
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QUOTE (Siege @ Oct 21 2003, 05:28 AM)
I make reference of this because I heard something similar 10 years ago from a local competition.

I don't doubt the accuracy of the event -- for the same reason that most boxers win against karate students.  Muay Thai is simple and half of the "martial art" is the physical training regimen.  Which is lacking from a number of contemporary schools. (IMHO)

I agree completely about the incomparable physical training that muay thai fighters go through. Nothing else (that I've seen, at any rate) comes close. That's what I meant when I said I had no desire/inclination to undergo such a punishing training regimen in order to excel in the art - and you do have to go through it to become a good muay thai boxer.

The training acclimatizes a muay thai boxer to real pain. In many of the cases, they deaden/de-sensitize their pain receptors in areas such as their shins, forearms, etc. so they don't really feel the pain when they strike or are struck. The closest I've seen to that was in my dojo and a handful of other schools in which the instructors understood the value of this and tried to incorporate it into their classes for people who turned up 4-5 times a week to train. Even then, my sensei acknowledged that it was NOWHERE NEAR real muay thai training.
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Siege
post Oct 21 2003, 05:52 AM
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I clarified because it sounded like I was casting aspersions on your story and that wasn't my intent.

As for "good", that's relative. I will never step into a Muay Thai ring with the expectation of being a professional fighter.

But I would like to round out my skill with knees and elbows, not to mention shin and thigh kicks.

-Siege
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Dim Sum
post Oct 21 2003, 05:55 AM
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QUOTE (Siege)
I clarified because it sounded like I was casting aspersions on your story and that wasn't my intent.

As for "good", that's relative. I will never step into a Muay Thai ring with the expectation of being a professional fighter.

But I would like to round out my skill with knees and elbows, not to mention shin and thigh kicks.

-Siege

No problem - I didn't think you meant any disrespect (and even if you did, it's no skin off my back :D ).

With regards to muay thai strikes (knees, elbows, shins): you and me, both, mano.
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Digital Heroin
post Oct 21 2003, 08:04 AM
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Jeet Kune Do... that'll get my vote... Bruce wasn't just about the movies, he was pure, true, and effective as a martial artist. He knew his shyte...
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