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coolgrafix
When I run games I like to maintain a strict timeline of events. Example: Arcology Shutdown takes place here on this date, that's a Friday (or whatever). Bob the Runner gets out alive but is in the hospital for 10 weeks. That means he can't be used by his player until our timeline has moved that far ahead. It's important to my group to keep track of this sort of thing. The problem is that most calendaring software onlt goes to 2039 (or there abouts).

Well, I used to use the 10,000 Year Calendar for this, but that seems to be defunct now.

What do you folks use for this purpose, if anything?
Ed_209a
I got a calander from the 2050s from some website, I don't remember the name, sorry, but its out there.

If I had it to do over again, though, I would just use this year's calendar, and just say it's 20XX.

If my _Magical_, _Metahuman_, _cyborg_ players can't suspend their disbelief that little bit, I should kick them out. smile.gif
MK Ultra
I used to use a program called Unical, which worked fine, but I donīt know the sorce anymore.
ARKARY
When I double click the little clock thing in the bottom corner, my computer's calandar goes to 2099.
betageek
This link defaults to 2056 (the year of my campaign), but you can choose other years on the top of the page...

http://www.hf.rim.or.jp/~kaji/cal/cal.cgi?2056

Hope that helps.
Kyoto Kid
QUOTE (ARKARY)
When I double click the little clock thing in the bottom corner, my computer's calandar goes to 2099.

I've used this many times.

The day of the week can have an effect depending on where the characters are. Since my last campaign was set in Europe, Sundays were an issue particularly when trying to get last minute gear for a run. There are no Weapons Worlds, Hacker Shacks, or big mega level shopping malls with 40+ plex trid theatres. This is still the old world (at least the way I ran it) and Sunday is the day of rest for many.

Of course, the black market is always open and eager to relieve many a runner of their hard earned Euros or "Crowns".
Kagetenshi
I use iCal. Handy for record-keeping, too.

~J
coolgrafix
QUOTE (Kagetenshi)
I use iCal. Handy for record-keeping, too.

~J

Holy slotting drek! iCal used to stop at 2039, or whereever the hell the Unix epoc ends. Thanks for this headsup. Problem solved in spades! =)
SL James
I use the perpetual calendar in my 2002 World Almanac hardcopy or Windows clock, depending on where I'm writing.

QUOTE (coolgrafix)
When I run games I like to maintain a strict timeline of events. Example: Arcology Shutdown takes place here on this date, that's a Friday (or whatever).

December 19, 2059 is a Friday.

August 22, 2055 is a Sunday.

November 2, 2064 is a Sunday.

August 9, 2057 is a Thursday.

2070, btw, uses the same calendar as 2003. 2064 is the same as 2008.

That way you don't have to scroll all the way up with your Windows clock.
Cain
Calendars all rotate, anyway. You can't have more than 28 different calendars, although I can't remember the rotation formula. Still, you don't need a whole lot of processing space to figure it out.
SL James
Right. I know someone who can figure out the day of the week up to like 3,000 A.D. in her head.

Link to 2064 calendar. You can make your own for other years, too.

There's also a virtual perpetual calendar with year correlations, or you can just click on the year you want on this page.
tisoz
February 7, 2039 is a Monday. (Night of Rage)
SL James
Yep. And the Sears/IBM Tower bombing was on a Thursday.
John Campbell
QUOTE (Cain)
Calendars all rotate, anyway. You can't have more than 28 different calendars, although I can't remember the rotation formula. Still, you don't need a whole lot of processing space to figure it out.

14. Jan 1 on each day of the week, with and without a leap-day.

The Unix cal program doesn't actually use time_ts in its calendar algorithm, so it's fine with years out to 9999, and with 1752 and earlier years as well, which most date programs screw up (1752 was missing two weeks out of the middle of September). At least the versions on Linux and Solaris are; I don't have any other Unices handy to check at the moment. MacOS 10 should have cal; it may even be the same version that Linux uses.

I suppose 1752 makes it 15 possible calendars.
hyzmarca
The Gregorian calander isn't usd everywhere today and it won't be used everywhere in the future. In fact, the creation of new calanders and the reversion to old ones probably has some popularity after the Awakening.

The Gregorian calander tends to fall behind the seasons because it doesn't take into account that the solar day is becoming longer at a rate of 1.7 miliseconds per century. For some, particualary magicians performing sensitive seasonal and astrological rituals, this deviance is completely unacceptable.
eidolon
Don't know if it's been suggested yet, but MS Outlook's calendar has a "go to date" function. I was using it to plot a campaign in 2061, and you can type straight into it and print, see weekly or monthly views, etc.
fistandantilus4.0
QUOTE (tisoz)
February 7, 2039 is a Monday. (Night of Rage)

"Sounds like someone's got a case of the 'Mondays' "
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