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HappyDaze
I'm shopping for a few new magical traditions. Hopefully I can get a mix of 'new' styles (like Chaos Magic) and 'revived' styles, but I'm especially interested in non-Religious-tied styles. I was actually considering a tradition that is entirely based on music, but I was having a bit of trouble pulling it off. So, anyone have anything new to throw in?
Johnny Jacks
I don't have much fluff written for it, but one of my current characters is a Cartomancer, a magician who's tradition is based around a deck of playing cards (and inspired more than a little by Deadlands).

Clubs Combat Task
Spades Detection Guidance
Diamonds Health Earth
Jokers Illusion Man
Hearts Manipulation Water

Drain Attribute: Charisma (Because it's based around the idea of gambling with the spirits for the power to cast spells)
Possession Based
HappyDaze
Interesting...

Certainly not religious-tied (although a Catholic version that is linked to the letters B, I, N, G, and O might be possible).

I was having the thought of using the five inner planets as assoiations at one time, but then I remembered Exalted did that already...
NightmareX
The Bujinkan Tradition
Concept: Bujinkan magic results from the refinement of the human spirit through an understanding of the elements and the ever present kami. As the mind approaches enlightenment, the ninja is set free from the constraints of the flesh and can thusly use his ki through kuji-in and kuji-kiri to effect change in the physical world.
Combat: Guardian spirits
Detection: Guidance spirits
Health: Earth spirits
Illusion: Air spirits
Manipulation: Water spirits
Drain: Willpower + Intuition
Note: Bujinkan is a possession tradition.

A blend of traditional Shinto and Zen Buddhist beliefs, Bujinkin (literally "warrior spirit") is a product of the dispersal of traditional martial arts that began at the end of the 20th century. When the Awakening occured, the spiritual refinement techniques gained a renewed potency, but the sheer preponderance of fakes and con men claiming knowledge of "ancient ninja secrets" put of a damper on the tradition's acceptance and growth - in the public eye at least. Behind the scenes, the real masters quietly revived the old tradition, some incorporating the name given it by the 20th century master Masaaki Hatsumi and others not - like those of the old clans.
While Bujinkan shares the Shinto emphasis on spiritual "cleanliness" and respect for nature and the kami, this harmony is not sought for its own sake but for the sake of pragmatic necessity. The spirit, like the steel of a sword, must be pure to be strong and thus accomplish what is desired in the world. This pragmatism is echoed in the spirits that a Bujinkan magician calls on - ancestral spirits and the ghosts of great warriors for guidance and protection, spirits of air and water to become as ghosts themselves, and the spirits of the earth itself for vitality. Bujinkan magicians are traditionally mystic adepts, combining physical prowess with direct magic, but occasionally full magicians are trained as well.

The Fern Witchery Tradition
Concept: Fern Witchery relies on the balance of the five natural elements, the strength of the witch’s spirit, and the grace of fae spirits to reinforce harmony between Nature and the self and thus bring magic into the world.
Combat: Fire spirits
Detection: Water spirits
Health: Plant spirits
Illusion: Air spirits
Manipulation: Earth spirits
Drain: Willpower + Intuition

A hybrid creation of the Sixth World, fern witchery combines the nascent elven beliefs of Tir Tairngire with a basis of conventional witchcraft and various forms of faery Wicca and New Age philosophies that emerged in the 20th century. Grounded in strongly naturalistic and animistic beliefs, fern witchery is often mistaken for one of any number of eco-spiritual belief systems. Fern witchery originated in Tir Tairngire, and to a smaller extent, the Salish Sidhe Council, and is concentrated in those areas, although a small following has begun in Seattle. The term “fern witch? was originally a derogatory term for magically active elves who followed a “back to the land? philosophy, but the tradition has since claimed the name as its own. Despite its strongly elven connections, there are nearly as many non-elves practicing fern witchery as there are elves due to the tradition’s roots. Many fern witches follow a mentor spirit known as a totem, an ideological appropriation from shamanic traditions. Typical totems include animal totems, mythic totems, and nature totems as well as the Great Mother. The spirits summoned by fern witches take the form of various stereotypically faerie creatures: gnomes, salamanders, sylphs, undines, and the like.

Shadow Magic
Originally a form of dark paganism that started as a blend nascent magical practices with the Gothic chic of the late 20th century, shadow magic only really came into its own a couple of decades after the Awakening. Many individuals involved in paganism and similar forms of spirituality saw the Awakening as the beginning of a new, better world than the one in which they were currently living. When dream didn’t come to pass, and the resurgence of magic had in many cases actually made the world a worse place than before, some of these pagans and former Goths embraced a more nihilistic view of their own beliefs. Combined with a number of elements taken from the Hermetic tradition, this collection of dark pagan beliefs and Gothic nihilism eventually developed into the tradition of shadow magic as we know it today.
Modern followers of shadow magic rely heavily on introspection, ritual, and contact with spirits to advance in their magical understanding. To a shadow magician, magic is the lifeblood of existence, and the only thing with any real meaning. Everything else is transitory. Shadow mages summon spirits of the elements – fire, water, earth, and air – for power and practical knowledge, but their real fascination is with spirits of man, who they conceive of as the literal ghosts or shades of the dead.
Drain: Willpower + Intuition
Spirits: Combat spells – Fire spirits; Detection spells – Air spirits; Health spells – spirits of Man; Illusion spells – Water spirits; Manipulation spells – Earth spirits
Tools and Trappings: Magical tools in shadow magic include the dagger (athame) and pentacles common to both black magic and witchcraft. Gothic and dark elements, such as black candles, blood letting, skulls (real or fake), and copious amounts of incense are common elements of this tradition’s practices. Tarot reading and scrying are common methods of divination in shadow magic, while chanting in Latin or Greek is a common method of Centering. Some groups of shadow magicians who delve too deeply into the darkest aspects of their tradition learn the Sacrificing metamagic, thus becoming magical threats.

(Note - Shadow magic is was made when 4th first came out, and I'm unsure if it's even a good idea).
sunnyside
QUOTE (Johnny Jacks @ Aug 17 2008, 01:49 AM) *
I don't have much fluff written for it, but one of my current characters is a Cartomancer, a magician who's tradition is based around a deck of playing cards (and inspired more than a little by Deadlands).

Clubs Combat Task
Spades Detection Guidance
Diamonds Health Earth
Jokers Illusion Man
Hearts Manipulation Water

Drain Attribute: Charisma (Because it's based around the idea of gambling with the spirits for the power to cast spells)
Possession Based


Oh, there is some fun to be had there. Deadlands has a handful of things that really stand out like gems in the gaming world and hucksters are one of them, especially with a southern drawl when in character.

Though in this form it's awfully diluted. If the OP is the GM or is good friends with a GM who knows deadlands it actually might be worth bringing the mechanics over.


Johnny Jacks
QUOTE (sunnyside @ Aug 16 2008, 11:57 PM) *
Though in this form it's awfully diluted. If the OP is the GM or is good friends with a GM who knows deadlands it actually might be worth bringing the mechanics over.


Yeah, it was more inspired by Hucksters then based on them, because by the time I got done converting it to Shadowrun it was almost unrecognizable. A true Huckster tradition would be interesting, I might work on it.
ElFenrir
Long, long, ago, in an internet far away, I found the rules for a homebrew Tarot tradition, back in...Sr2 I think it was. It dissapeared somehow soon after, and I dunno who did it, or whatnot.

But I had decided to remake it in SR3. Now, I want to remake it in SR4. It wasn't my idea, and the whole tradition wasn't complete(they didn't do much with the summons at that time), but I started to go into the summon aspect, as well.

Hopefully, if I ever get it done(Each card of the High Arcana was a ''Totem/Mentor Spirit'' in a way), I'll repost it here. Thanks to whoever invented it at first like 12 or so years ago to inspire it.
Johnny Jacks
QUOTE (HappyDaze @ Aug 16 2008, 11:06 PM) *
I was having the thought of using the five inner planets as assoiations at one time, but then I remembered Exalted did that already...


Didn't stop me, I came up with one of those too. I associated each planet with a mentor spirit (based on the Roman gods) and one of the 5 type of magic and spirits:

Combat Beast Mars (Wolf)
Detection Air Mercury (Eagle)
Health Plant Saturn (Male Great Mother because Saturn was originally an agricultural deity)
Illusion Man Venus (Seductress)
Manipulation Fire Jupiter (Sky Father)

Drain Attribute: Logic (It's heavily based in math and calculating the positions of the various planets in the Zodiac)
Materialization Based
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