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Stahlseele
Scientists have figured out a way to produce diamonds cheap and easy.
And this time, it's not some hundred degree hot whiskey either.
http://phys.org/news/2015-11-phase-carbon-...emperature.html
Mantis
Not just room temperature diamonds but a new phase state for carbon and these one is magnetic as well. Nifty. Now what new and interesting uses can this be put to. The article mentions displays but I'm guessing there is more.
KCKitsune
Did either of you catch the process in which the diamonds are formed? The laser pules heat the carbon to 4,000 Kelvin. This would prevent it from being applied to clothing, but not to metal weapons.

Now I don't know about you but to me that almost sounds EXACTLY like the process in which dikote is applied.
Mantis
Yeah but I figured the need for a glass, plastic or sapphire substrate pretty much precluded application to clothing, so yeah dikote. Now to find out if adding this to my knife adds to the damage it does...
Tymeaus Jalynsfein
QUOTE (Mantis @ Dec 4 2015, 09:46 AM) *
Yeah but I figured the need for a glass, plastic or sapphire substrate pretty much precluded application to clothing, so yeah dikote. Now to find out if adding this to my knife adds to the damage it does...


If nothing else, It might penetrate better. smile.gif
KnightAries
QUOTE (KCKitsune @ Dec 3 2015, 10:02 PM) *
Did either of you catch the process in which the diamonds are formed? The laser pules heat the carbon to 4,000 Kelvin. This would prevent it from being applied to clothing, but not to metal weapons.

Now I don't know about you but to me that almost sounds EXACTLY like the process in which dikote is applied.

Very close to the same but not exactly like it. Dikote used plasma.
But reading the article did make me wonder if some of the scientists used to play SR and decided to see what would happen if the actually tried the process (or RL equivalent) from the game.
Apparently SR is still predicting some of the future. biggrin.gif
Stahlseele
QUOTE (KCKitsune @ Dec 4 2015, 06:02 AM) *
Did either of you catch the process in which the diamonds are formed? The laser pules heat the carbon to 4,000 Kelvin. This would prevent it from being applied to clothing, but not to metal weapons.

Now I don't know about you but to me that almost sounds EXACTLY like the process in which dikote is applied.

oh welp, so much for looking FAABUULOOUUS!
Sendaz
Depends, as its the quenching technique that they are using after the pulse to rapidly dissipate the heat that may still make it possible.

http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journ....1063/1.4936595

One point in particular catches the eye :

QUOTE
The amorphous carbon films were deposited on sapphire (c-plane), glass, and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) substrates by using KrF laser (pulse duration = 25 ns, wavelength = 248 nm, energy density = 3.0 J cm−2) to a thickness of 50500 nm

emphasis mine as HDPE is a widely used plastic, from everything from milk jugs to piping, and thermally it would not stand up to the aforementioned 4000 K either, so the quenching technique must be rapid enough to lose the heat before structural integrity is lost in the plastic substrate.

http://www.livescience.com/52974-new-mater...an-diamond.html here this article mentions a bit more about the speed which it cools it down at.
QUOTE
But the quenching process cools the liquid carbon at 1.8 billion degrees Fahrenheit per second (1 billion degrees Celsius per second).


now keep in mind everything is happening here in nanoseconds so when you look at whole seconds it seems huge, but even at the tiny bits of time, this is a considerable cooldown which in turn does mean they can use a range of substrate to lay the diamond film on.

In any case, will be worth keeping an eye on this research.

Plus did you see the part where they say they can make this stuff GLOW?

QUOTE
The tight fit between carbon atoms also means electrons are bursting to get out of the carbon atoms, so the slightest voltage can spur carbon atoms to release electrons, creating a soft glow. That makes it perfect for creating screen displays that use less power, Narayan said.


So if they can figure out how make a coating on a pleather jacket and apply a small current you too could look FAABUULOOUUS!
Cochise
QUOTE (Sendaz)
So if they can figure out how make a coating on a pleather jacket and apply a small current you too could look FAABUULOOUUS!


Or they found the first step to what Ruthenium was originally supposed to do ... 2 in 1 deal
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