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emo samurai
Shiawase- Japanese for "happy."
Renraku- Japanese for "communication."
Wuxing- Chinese for "Five Stars."

What about Saeder-Krupp and Yamatetsu? Maybe even Mitsuhama?
adamu
Well, first of all, they are basically just names. Real life Mitsubishi means "three chestnuts," but no one in Japan thinks of it that way any more than we think of Bob Smith as a blacksmith or Todd Johnson as the son of John. My wife's name before we got married was (is) Setsuko Kawahara, which means "season child" and "river bed." Believe me, neither her nor her parents ever think of the names in those terms.

Still, no doubt it is fun to translate the names. Unfortunately, one cannot be sure of the translation without seeing the Chinese characters (even for the Japanese names). Probably, though, Mitsuhama is "three beaches" and Yamatetsu is "mountain iron," or "iron mountain," if you like.
Demonseed Elite
Adamu is right, to an extent. When the Renraku corporation was named Renraku (it was previously Keruba International), it was playing off of the meaning of "communication." Inazo Aneki was fascinated by communication, human/software interaction, and sociology. Of course, that personal interest ended up creating the Renraku Arcology and Deus and ended with Aneki's death.

Wuxing actually translates to "five elements", though that's even a rough translation since the Chinese concept of elements is different from the Western one.
Rock
Krupp doesn't have a translation as such instead coming from the name of the firm (and the original family) although the word krupp can be used in German as an adjective meaning strong, probably in reference to their steel's strength. (EX: Es ist sehr krupp, ja?)

It's like Chrysler in Nissan-Chrylser. It's just a family name that is attached to a company. A close name to those you are thinking about would be something like Ares Macrotechnology, clearly coming from Ares the Greek God of War.
MYST1C
QUOTE (Rock)
Es ist sehr krupp, ja?

Having spent my entire life (27 years) in Germany I have never heard or seen this use of the word "Krupp" before!

Around the Nazi time there existed the saying "Hart wie Kruppstahl" (Eng: "hard as Krupp steel"), but that's quite antiquated (besides, the company is named Thyssen-Krupp today).
FanGirl
QUOTE (Demonseed Elite @ Jul 4 2006, 09:43 AM)
Wuxing actually translates to "five elements", though that's even a rough translation since the Chinese concept of elements is different from the Western one.

Did you know that Emo is Chinese? wink.gif
Brahm
QUOTE (M$T1C @ Jul 4 2006, 02:48 PM)
QUOTE (Rock @ Jul 4 2006, 06:35 PM)
Es ist sehr krupp, ja?

Having spent my entire life (27 years) in Germany I have never heard or seen this use of the word "Krupp" before!

Around the Nazi time there existed the saying "Hart wie Kruppstahl" (Eng: "hard as Krupp steel"), but that's quite antiquated (besides, the company is named Thyssen-Krupp today).

Local slang probably.

Speaking of which I always imagined there quite a difference between east and west slang. Even all these years since reunification. Does such a divide exist?
MYST1C
QUOTE (Brahm)
Speaking of which I always imagined there quite a difference between east and west slang. Even all these years since reunification. Does such a divide exist?

There are indeed differences between East and West German speech habits. Even East Germans speaking standard German instead of a distinctive dialect (an extreme, instantly recognisable dialect example would be Saxonian) often show a certain choice of words and small grammatical differences that betray their origin.
Demonseed Elite
QUOTE (FanGirl @ Jul 4 2006, 02:52 PM)
QUOTE (Demonseed Elite @ Jul 4 2006, 09:43 AM)
Wuxing actually translates to "five elements", though that's even a rough translation since the Chinese concept of elements is different from the Western one.

Did you know that Emo is Chinese? wink.gif

He's using the wrong translation, though. Wuxing, the corporation, is 五行. Which is "five elements." 五星 would indeed be "five stars", but that's the wrong "xing."

Page 76 of Portfolio of a Dragon mentions that the corporation's name means "five elements."
Homme-qui-rigole
Fuchi translate in "abyss"
emo samurai
They write the name in Chinese? Where?

And is it true about "Fuchi?" Does it translate into Musashi's "void" element?
FanGirl
QUOTE (Demonseed Elite)
QUOTE (FanGirl @ Jul 4 2006, 02:52 PM)
QUOTE (Demonseed Elite @ Jul 4 2006, 09:43 AM)
Wuxing actually translates to "five elements", though that's even a rough translation since the Chinese concept of elements is different from the Western one.

Did you know that Emo is Chinese? wink.gif

He's using the wrong translation, though. Wuxing, the corporation, is ??. Which is "five elements." ?? would indeed be "five stars", but that's the wrong "xing."

Page 76 of Portfolio of a Dragon mentions that the corporation's name means "five elements."

Ooooh, I get it. I can definitely see how rendering Chinese words in Roman characters would cause confusion, though.
emo samurai
Oooh, simulateneous posts...

I'm not mocking you... frown.gif
Kagetenshi
QUOTE (FanGirl)
Did you know that Emo is Chinese? wink.gif

Is he? I'd always assumed he was American of Chinese ancestry.

~J
Birdy
QUOTE (Brahm)
QUOTE (M$T1C @ Jul 4 2006, 02:48 PM)
QUOTE (Rock @ Jul 4 2006, 06:35 PM)
Es ist sehr krupp, ja?

Having spent my entire life (27 years) in Germany I have never heard or seen this use of the word "Krupp" before!

Around the Nazi time there existed the saying "Hart wie Kruppstahl" (Eng: "hard as Krupp steel"), but that's quite antiquated (besides, the company is named Thyssen-Krupp today).

Local slang probably.

Speaking of which I always imagined there quite a difference between east and west slang. Even all these years since reunification. Does such a divide exist?

Never heard the term used where I spend the last decade. And that is only 30km from the "Villa Hgel" (Home of the Krupp Dynastie) in the Ruhr Valley. Neither heard that back in Braunschweig where I spend quite some time with Ex-GDR citizins shortly after germanies second-biggest mistake.

We have an Illness known as (Pseudo)Krupp, a lung/bronchial thing IIRC. Aside from that, it's part of the "classical": "Tough as Leather, Hard as Krupp Steel, Fast as the racing dogs" motto given out to the german use by a certain second rate Austrian painter. "Krupp Stahl" is actually a special type of surface hardened steel (Krupp Cementit Verfahren) used for warships.

emo samurai
QUOTE (Kagetenshi)
QUOTE (FanGirl @ Jul 4 2006, 02:52 PM)
Did you know that Emo is Chinese? wink.gif

Is he? I'd always assumed he was American of Chinese ancestry.

~J

What clued you in? Was it my apparent lack of self-discipline?
Birdy
Frankfurter Bankenverein is "Frankfurt Bank Club", a Verein being something that is founded when three germans spend more than an hour together.

AG Chemie Europa is Aktien Gesellschaft Chemie, Europe or Chemistry Incorporated, Europe.

BuMoNa (Bund fr Mobilen Notfall-Arzteinsatz) is Organisation/Coorporation for Mobile Emergency Doctors Operations

BMW (Bayrische Motoren Werke aka Bums mal Wieder, Bei Mercedes Weggeworfen) is Bavarian Engine Producers (or Fu... again or Thrown Away by Mercedes)

MET 2000 (Mobile Eingreiftruppe 2000) is Mobile Invention Force 2000

Proteus most like comes from Prometeus, the Greek guy who brought humanity the fire

Demonseed Elite
QUOTE (emo samurai)
They write the name in Chinese? Where?

It doesn't appear in Chinese lettering anywhere in print, but it does appear in print as translating to "five elements." There's only one way to write "five elements" in Chinese lettering that also comes out as "Wuxing." smile.gif
emo samurai
k00l...
Nath
QUOTE (Birdy @ Jul 4 2006, 09:56 PM)
Proteus most like comes from Prometeus, the Greek guy who brought  humanity the fire

Proteus is the actual name of another greek mythological figure, a minor god, "old man of the sea" with shapeshifting powers.

"Saeder", as in Saeder-Krupp, is the danish for "seat" or something like that. I doesn't seem to be used as a family name, thought I don't see how it could end up with a company called "Seat Munitions" or "Seat Strategic Industries". My guess is that some US authors randomly made up a name that sounded German (as far as I remember, S-K appeared first in the NAGNA, some times before german authors walked in with the Germany sourcebook).
At some point during the writing of SoE, I toyed with the idea of having Saeder being an acronym who lost capitalization (like Fiat). Having 'SA' at the beginning of a French company name is a common feature, it's like having 'AG' at the beginning of a German company name (besides, SA et AG are similar type of companies). But anyway there wasn't enough room in the book to put everything.
Slump
QUOTE (Birdy)
Proteus most like comes from Prometeus, the Greek guy who brought humanity the fire

Likely not. Proteus was an actual mythological figure of his own right. Typically portrayed as the son of Poseidon, he was sea-going and could change shape. He also was gifted with prophesy, but was very stingy and never told anyone what he saw.


A Proteus is also a class of bacteria typically associated with urinary tract infections. I'm betting it's in reference to the god, though.
mfb
as i recall, all of the original megacorp names were lifted from actual corporations. Saeder-Krupp, for instance, probably came from Friedrich Krupp AG Hoesch-Krupp. i know there's an actual Ares, Inc that produces firearms. i'm pretty sure i've seen links to Aztechnology on the boards.
SL James
You have.
MYST1C
QUOTE (Birdy)
Frankfurter Bankenverein is "Frankfurt Bank Club", a Verein being something that is founded when three germans spend more than an hour together.

The official English name ist "Frankfurt Bank Association (FBA)", though.

QUOTE
BMW (Bayrische Motoren Werke aka Bums mal Wieder, Bei Mercedes Weggeworfen) is Bavarian Engine Producers

Officially: "Bavarian Motor Works".

QUOTE
MET 2000 (Mobile Eingreiftruppe 2000) is Mobile Invention Force 2000

I think you mean "Mobile Intervention Force 2000".
James McMurray
QUOTE (emo samurai)
QUOTE (Kagetenshi @ Jul 4 2006, 03:39 PM)
QUOTE (FanGirl @ Jul 4 2006, 02:52 PM)
Did you know that Emo is Chinese? wink.gif

Is he? I'd always assumed he was American of Chinese ancestry.

~J

What clued you in? Was it my apparent lack of self-discipline?

What clued me in was that time when you said it in a post. smile.gif
FanGirl
Oh. Once I refered to Emo as "Chinese-American" and he told me that his ancestors would kill me for saying that. smile.gif
Kagetenshi
Well, I'm just trying to draw out the distinction of whether or not he is Chinese, or whether he is of Chinese ancestry (being as they are entirely different things).

One of my pet peeves, like the guy at work who would insist on being Irish despite being unable to find Cork on a map.

~J
Nikoli
I think that would classify him as a stupid American.
Shanshu Freeman
QUOTE (Nikoli @ Jul 6 2006, 12:55 AM)
I think that would classify him as a stupid American.

Hey now. Let's be fair.




He may be a citizen of the USA, and he may be stupid, but that's no reason to propigate slurs.
Dog
Novatech: Doesn't "Nova" mean "doesn't go" in Portugese or something? Har har.

Kagetenshi
To use Wikipedia's example, it doesn't mean "doesn't go" any more than "notable" when used to discuss furnishings for a dining room would imply that there aren't any surfaces intended for eating.

~J
FanGirl
According to Dictionary.com, a nova is "a star that suddenly becomes much brighter and then gradually returns to its original brightness over a period of weeks to years." The word comes from the feminine form of the Latin word novus, meaning "new," so one can assume that the name Novatech is supposed to mean "New Technology."

There is also a famous urban legend about how the Chevrolet Nova didn't sell well in "Spanish-speaking countries," because the phrase "no va" means "doesn't go" in Spanish. This is total BS, as Snopes.com explains here.

EDIT: My sooper-dooper translation program says that the phrase "doesn't go" translates to "no vai" in Portuguese.
emo samurai
"No va" mean's "don't go" in Spanish, but nova is one word.

And I usually saw it as a play on "Novahot," which is a huge slang term in SR.
Kagetenshi
"Novahot" meaning "new and hot". See "new hotness" for the modernday version.

~J
John Campbell
Or possibly "as hot as an exploding star".
FanGirl
No, that's "supernovahot."
Herald of Verjigorm
Nova is an exploding star. A supernova is a subset of that which is typically bigger. I don't immediately remember if the neutron/visible binary setup is a criteria on supernovas, but it does make for a repeatable boom.
Kagetenshi
That's not actually true. A nova is an explosion on a star, but in contrast to a supernova, the explosion is a tiny fraction of the mass of the starthe star keeps on burning merrily afterwards. A supernova doesn't leave much behind.

Edit: well, I guess you could argue that it is true. I'd say the processes are distinct, but I'm not going to try to sway anyone to that banner or anything.

~J
Kyoto Kid
...and stars massive enough to cause a supernova usually collapse into black holes.

not what I would want to name my corp after.
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