Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: PC wants to make Money between the Runs!
Dumpshock Forums > Discussion > Shadowrun
Pages: 1, 2
i101
Hoi,

Ive got a problem within my group. Mudane players feel disadvantaged by their magic teammates that can earn money thru enchating reagents and selling em for good money. This doenst happen so often, but imagine a hacker and a streetsam that have to watch how their colleagues from time to time between the runs make more money then in the runs.

The point is that I am not sure how to let the mudane players make some money between the runs. I found a solution for the streetsam, he developed thru his career some nice connections and is now selling/buying weapons. He does it on minimal base, so that he can miss for a few days to be part of a shadowrun, but engage his gunrunner role from time to time.

The problem is my hacker, he wants to create stuff like fake IDs and sell em, or plunder something in the matrix. Does their a char exist, or some rules what a hacker can do inbetween without big Gamemaster interaction? Have to mention that we handle almoste all stuff between the runs on our local forum, that way it cant run out of controll.

Regards.
Fortune
Hackers by far have the easiest time making money outside of shadowruns. So easy in fact, that it sometimes stretches belief that they would actually endanger themselves doing such work when they could cut IC and rack up cred with ease in myriad other ways.

Possibly as a solution, instead of looking for ways for others to make money outside of game time, you might consider cutting down the free time available to the players between in-game jobs. Making magical anything is a time-consuming process, and that kind of free time in large chunks might not often be feasible.
Crusher Bob
Part of this should be addressed out of game as well as in game. For example, do the players feel that they are getting enough money from running? If you are paying them 5K a run a piece, and they are pulling down 25K a month from their enchanting gig, why should they get off their butts for a run? If they are getting 25K per run, and 5K a month from their enchanting gig, that's a different story all together.

Another thing to do is give them options on what to do with their downtime other that making money. So for example, they might get 1 karma a week from training instead, or the hacker can get 'free' backdoors into systems by setting them up during down time. This way there is a choice of what to do during your down time other than make money or nothing.
Blade
Making money outside runs can lead to players prefering to get money that way instead of running. That's especially true for mages who can get a whole lot of money creating orichalcuum, for example.

There are several ways to prevent that: making runs rewarding enough (in money and/or karma), making getting big money between runs very difficult (as soon as you get successful, you'll get attention from the mafias, competitors or corps), changing the scope of the game from shadowrunning to money-making, or telling your players that you're playing shadowrun and not a business simulation game.

Once you've sorted out that problem, I guess the best way to keep it in control is to consider that running a business takes time, hence make it harder to train skills or attribute, learn spells and do all that kind of things runner might like to do. It's also detrimental to the runner's anonymity and makes it easier to find you. Finally it might get you some trouble.
I'm not saying this to keep players away from having businesses, but I think it makes sense, and it also makes having a business something more (and more interesting) than just a way to get free money.
ElFenrir
Orichalcum is a big moneymaker, and the thing is, not terribly hard to make when you think about it...but its got some drawbacks as well You need a pretty fair enchanting score to get the hits, with a full lab, but the ingredients for it are findable by any mage with even a fair knowledge of gathering.
But where it gets hairy is the 28 days of circulation. If you keep them busy most of the time, they'll only get this maybe once, twice a year(and since a unit of the stuff sells for around 88,000 book price...probably what, 60,000 street they could get for it...they only NEED to sell 1-2 times a year,and they are probably getting more than one unit per circulation.

Hell, a mage with a high enchanting score could sit out a couple months a year, get the materials, hope to hit 3-4 units of orichalcum(not difficult), sell it, and get around 2k for it, living the high life and never moving off his butt for a damn year. nyahnyah.gif I mean, work 2 months gathering and sitting around a lab getting 6 digits for your efforts, or running twice a month risking your tail? (Now, selling expensive stuff black market carries its own risks, but technically, a mage that creates it, as far as i know, isn't doing anything wrong. It's certainly lesser risk than running onsite every week. And if they have a dedicated higher-end talismonger that buys from them every year, its not as shady.)

And other enchanting is nothing to sneeze at either, of course. So yeah, don't take it away from them...but keep them moving a bit more perhaps, so they don't get TONS of free time for it. (And not all enchanting takes 28 days. They can have plenty else to do, so they won't feel the skill is wasted.)

I had my bouncer/roadie/adept guy rent himself out for bodyguarding, since he's had some experience in that too, and the skills are pretty cross-class if you will(ie, a bouncer had alot of skills a bodyguard would have). He also still hired himself out to any bands his contact back in Norway would have contact with, while he was in the States, so while the pay wasn't anywhere near the runs(one doesn't get alot helping lower end people), it helped keep him afloat. Im sure some other adepts/sams can find these kinds of jobs, riggers can hire themselves out for mechanic work/vehicle jobs, hackers have the whole Matrix at their fingertips, detectives can find people's lost wives/kids/husbands/cats/etc.

Ryu
Orichalkum is the big money maker, and the price only justified if it is not as easy to make as the rules say. Once you´ve forbidden making that, we are talking a rather standard income of a few hundred ¥ per day - we are talking trained pros here.

What are you going to do about a decker that wants to sell his selfmade rating 6 program at half-standard price? Better offer him some programming work for cash.

Adepts can participate in illegal street fights. Those do not need to be played out, but betting can make serious money here.

Street Sams often make for good security consultants. There are enough illicit types that won´t be the ones to let LoneStar design their security setup.

Ah, and forgot the most important part: Your runners should not need to make money on the side. Pay them well, especially if you still play SR3.
Fuchs
I'd do it as Blake said - shift some focus on those "side activities", add problems, and opportunities. Maybe the next "break in and replace a file" is not a job from a johnson, but done so the license for the mage's shop matches with the records?

Maybe the bodyguard ends up with some information he should not have, or with trouble he can't solve alone. The hacker gets a job offer for some system designing he can't refuse, and needs some assurance to survive the job. Or the talismonger gets some dubious artefact sold to.

Lots of opportunities for adventures and runs in such activities - half my campaign is about such stuff, not the usual paid for runs.
Blade
QUOTE ("Fuchs")
Maybe the next "break in and replace a file" is not a job from a johnson, but done so the license for the mage's shop matches with the records?


Or maybe the next "break in and replace a file" is a job from a Johnson, who's actually working for a competitor of the mage, so that he can claim the mage's shop. wink.gif
Fuchs
And enemies made through those side jobs have an easier time tracking the runners too - as my runners found out last run.
Moon-Hawk
My solution:
Whenever a player feels that their character has a marketable skill, we talk about how much time they're willing to put into it, how good they are at it, etc, and we agree on what lifestyle it's worth. They get their lifestyle costs covered for free, and in return they have less free time for other downtime activities and I get wonderful plot hooks involving their day jobs. It sounds like a perfectly fair deal to me, and my players love it.
Maybe the enchanters can talk a high lifestyle (or hell, maybe luxury, it's not that big of a deal) out of you but the street sam only gets low, but handing out lifestyles generally keeps things running better than handing out cash.
Lifestyle differences will cause less problems than cash differences in terms of people's feelings at the table, and will cause less imbalance in the game.

If they still have a problem and demand cash that they can use for anything they want, then maybe you need to talk to them about playing Shadowrun, not Smallbusinessrun.
nezumi
That has got to be the most graceful solution I've seen to this problem. Hats off to that one, I like it very much.
Kyoto Kid
...agreed. I might take this into consideration during my next campaign (extra hooks are always nice).

A lot of my characters have some skills that translate into everyday occupations and the licenses (when needed) to back them up. Usually it is for a cover act, but there wouldn't be any reason why they can't also defray a bit of lifestyle cost with these skills.
ShadowDragon8685
My soloution is simple, and to the point.


If(players) Search.jobs during (time.downtime)

Then:

Increase nuyen.gif gained per run

Else:

Do Nothing.




If the players feel they need more cash than running is getting them, then you need to jack the cash per run. Don't have them trying to whore themselves out or pursuing side-tasks for cash or glory.

Everything should be a group activity - from getting money (traditionally by doing something illeagal, hence a Shadowrun) to taking over their own corner of the barrens. Nobody should be left out like that.
jklst14
QUOTE (Moon-Hawk)
My solution:
Whenever a player feels that their character has a marketable skill, we talk about how much time they're willing to put into it, how good they are at it, etc, and we agree on what lifestyle it's worth.  They get their lifestyle costs covered for free, and in return they have less free time for other downtime activities and I get wonderful plot hooks involving their day jobs.  It sounds like a perfectly fair deal to me, and my players love it.
Maybe the enchanters can talk a high lifestyle (or hell, maybe luxury, it's not that big of a deal) out of you but the street sam only gets low, but handing out lifestyles generally keeps things running better than handing out cash.
Lifestyle differences will cause less problems than cash differences in terms of people's feelings at the table, and will cause less imbalance in the game.

If they still have a problem and demand cash that they can use for anything they want, then maybe you need to talk to them about playing Shadowrun, not Smallbusinessrun.

This is what I do to. I find that it works out pretty well.
wargear
We played a gang level game. Using the expanded rules for Lifestyle, we built a hideout capable of supporting the entire gang in some small comfort, and financed it through stealing cars for the local chop shop. We negotiated to 10% of the cars value in creds, low value credsticks or goods, and found that a single Ford Americar a week was enough to support a gang of 20 in a communal low lifestyle.

And pay for us to buy armour and weapons for the gang as we grew.

Everything we did on top of that was either pure profit, or was put towards the gang leadership getting wire.
i101
Thanks for all those relpys.
In my eyes increasing the money per run may not be the ultimate solution. Big money for a run means for me as a GM that the run also has to be big. Furthermore I personal find a lil bit unrealistic that a group does always top-notch jobs.

Unfortunately it looks like a lot of you find that enchating is the root of all evil. What I am looking for is an alternativ for mudan PCs.
Tell me how I shall tell the Hacker if he wants to make some money during downtime, that he simply cant?! In my eyes a hacker can make even more? or at least easier money then a mage or anyone else. All I need are some rules and chars. Looks like I have to make some chars up by my own if something like doesnt exist in any offical Sourcebooks.

PC in my group are looking for alteratives things they can do during downtime. Somehow it helps to create a more individual character that wants to use his/her skills, that may not be usefull during an active shadowrun but that are an essential part of their PC. I have to mention that in our group we agreed that stuff that happens during downtime will be published on our local forum. When we meet for a run, we really only play the shadowrun and handle everything else on our forum. Unfortunately we dont have the time to meet in real every three or four days to handle this stuff. 10years ago we had the time.
Anyways, small storys are written, how he/she does what he/she wants to do and then I as a Gamemaster give them their treshholds and reply their requests.

Our Hacker gives me the creeps ... Certainly couse the matrix is the only thing I dont know that much about ...
Blade
For the hacker, it depends on your conception of Matrix security in 2070. Some like to pretend that it's exactly as in 2007, that users will have poor protection and so on.
I think that after 2 attacks that wiped out the whole network, a Matrix built by corps and a lot of time with an ubiquitous matrix, matrix security is a serious business, and big time hacking leads to trouble.
Nightwalker450
I didn't play SR3 myself, but my GM gave my character a low point negative quality of a day job (was only like 5 points) that he said was in SR3. It waived a portion of my lifestyle costs, and was time I had to spend every week doing my job. Of course I took a very flexible job (cabbie).

Perhaps we need to get some brainstorming as to what some good rules would be some sort of quality to use for a character with a job. Doing work outside of a day job, selling items shouldn't make much more than fencing items, in fact it would probably make quite a bit less. Since its not a business they don't know where you're getting the stuff you're selling them or how reputable you are as a craftsman, the items you're selling aren't brand names they are things you made in your basement. A day job sets up the contacts/regularity that allow you make cash.

Rating should be based on:

1) Hours per Week (negative)
This could be from 10 - 60 hours per week. This takes time away from your runs, and your legwork you can perform. Anytime you miss a week it will affect your income and you could possibly loose the job altogether.

2) Flexibility (negative)
This is related to hours, in that if you work x hours per week, do they care when or are you working the 8-5 every day.

3) Visibility (negative)
A rating to establish how easy you are to find due to your job, probably based off of Hours per Week, the more time you spend at your job the easier you are to pin point to a job. This isn't based off of income, because a street drug dealer might only do 10 hours, but make tons of nuyen.

4) Contacts (positive)
This would be your job co-workers or customers. This would probably be covered as normal contacts though likely only a loyalty of 1 unless you had worked at the job for a long time.

5) Income per Week (positive)
This is the reason you're really taking the quality unless its for backstory purposes. Eitherway I'd recommend amounts equal to probably 1/10 of the lifestyle choices. So working a month covers almost half of an equivilant lifestyle. Why so little, because if your dayjob supports a luxury lifestyle you're not running. Non-runner chars could make more but for characters these would be the recommended limits.
EDIT: This should also be based on the skill the character will be using for the job

Ok those are categories that I think should come in to play, basically this would be a swing quality... It could be a positive or a negative quality depending on how it calculates out. Though as to whether or not a negative quality would actually award build points at the beginning is in the air. Probably not, unless as a GM you have some good ideas on how to penalize them if they decide their first week they're going to get fired. There's no numbers on these at the moment, I'll do some number crunching and probably post more later.
kzt
There are numerous jobs you can do that don't really interfere with your shadowrunning life and can actually benefit from things like experience with weapons and violence. And don't require SINs. Pimping, for example. . . .
Nightwalker450
Ok here's some number just thrown together. I'm trying to close the range but here's what I have so far.

Pay Per Week
17 == 1000 nuyen.gif
12 == 500 nuyen.gif
7 == 200 nuyen.gif
2 == 100 nuyen.gif

Hours/Week
-1 == <15
-6 == 15-30
-11 == >30

Flexibility
2 == Own Boss
-3 == Swing Shift
-8 == Tight Schedule

Visibility
2 == Low or No Visibility
-3 == High Visibility

This is going with the Concept of trying to keep Qualities on Multiples of 5. This swings from -20 to 20. I took contacts out of the equation, basically those could be bought or earned as normal contacts. I shed the Luxury Lifestyle job which would of been 10,000 nuyen.gif per week. Because making 520,000 nuyen.gif a year and shadowrunning is beyond me.

What is a -20 point job?
High Visibility no control over your 30+ hours per week. But only making 100 nuyen.gif per week. So you're making 3 nuyen.gif per hour as a high profile person's consort. You're seen on the arm of a trid star and you're really just with him for the fame not the little scraps he gives you. Either that or they actually own you, the fact that you get any nuyen per week at all is something you're thankful for.

What is a 20 job?
A Low visibility job where you work 10 hours a week when you feel like it, and make 1000 nuyen.gif per week. This would be a back alley dealer with the good stuff. People contact him when they want stuff, and he tells them when he'll meet them and where. The person has to be able to make stuff of a quality worth this.
kzt
Hmm, how much does a permanent low lifestyle cost again?
ShaunClinton
We have the opposite situation in my campaign, in that it is the mundane who makes all of the money!

Orichalicum production can be an issue but 30 uninterrupted days is pretty hard to manage for most PCs with any kind of enemies.

Meanwhile the decker just rams his computer skill, gets a hold of a good deck and then steals time on a host. By using an auto-coder and the help of a halfway competent assistant he can start cranking out programs like there is no tomorrow.

The decker we have pushed his skill way past the SOTA into the teens and then started selling mega high rating programs to the corps in exchange for money. Even though we limited the number of non-source copies he could sell to four he still started making mega-bucks very quickly.

With a good program plan and other favourable situational modifiers you can blast out rating 20 programs in what seems like no time with sufficient skill. The decker has accumulated vast wealth whilst most of the awakened PCs have pennies to scrap together as they spend it all on foci and the like.
Ryu
I prefer the Moonhawk solution. Much. The economic system of SR was never strong enough to stand on its own feet. It is simple and fast for RUNNING, but nothing else. Remember 2nd ed survival knifes?

Giving out more money will not always make the problem go away. The player may care more about the gear list of his char than about his free time. You know who you are.

Giving out little money on the other hand... that one creates problems. The abstract lifestyle costs alone kill the idea. Here even waiving cost may not work because the players want to spend money on things that are not covered by livestyle.
Slump
In SR3, a decker who was making his own programs to make money is retarded. With a half-way decent deck, you can pull so much paydata out of a system it's absurd, and each 'run' takes like 2 minutes, tops. Just drive around town, hitting up jackpoints and hack up low-security hosts and you'll end up with thousands upon thousands of nuyen in just a few short hours of hard work.
Pendaric
Hmm Things people do for money between runs....
Well the decker can be a trideo repair/ electronics guy. Run into host for paydata that then is brokered for cash as already noted. If they have the skills they can be a deckmiester for less talented deckers.
The big one that everyone can do is be a teacher within their sphere of skills. This one is great for roleplay and to add NPCs to care about and be responsiable for etc.

May i inquire how your magicain got his enchanting shop? Also how does he get his gold for the oricalcum? More importantly how do they perform deals without being riped off? Who does he pay protection too?
With any downtime activity there is plenty of room to build in challenges that can become runs for the entire group.
The trick is to place the group into a realistic world with checks and balances. So for example, decker x is a nova hot world class programmer? Great the computer megacorps will extract him for his talent. To stop the corps and the syndicates from trying to rest control means money, connections and insurance plans. In other words, shadow runs.

The SR world economics unfortunatly do not help on this score but its a matter of rolling with the punchs.
ShaunClinton
My PCs don't pay protection to anyone. There aren't many people who can challenge them who would waste their time with a protection racket.
nezumi
My PCs do. Sure no one is going to attack them directly, but boy would they be pissed if they came home to find their place looted or just burned to the ground. And there's more than once when they've come home limping with their tail between their legs, clearly hurting. If the local gang was in ill spirits, it could have finished them off pretty quick instead of telling the fuzz no one had swung by in a while. It's not like the gangs charge a lot, and it's just good biz to make good with the neighbors.
i101
@Nightwalker450: Thank You a lot. This example system you have given is very nice. But I have to confess that I havent understood everything ...
QUOTE
Pay Per Week
17 == 1000:nuyen:
12 == 500:nuyen:
7 == 200:nuyen:
2 == 100:nuyen:

What do the numbers before the money mean? In any case thanks again. I'll have to translate this for SR4 as soon you give me the answer LOL.

@ShaunClinton & Slump: I am working on a few charts that will allow our team hacker to hack into some random nodes and earn that way good paydata. Do you guys remeber the sourcebook Sprawl Sites? SR1 if Im not wrong (been a long time). Anyways in Sprawl Sites you had a very good encounter chart, depending where the PC where (AAA-Z), the GM could dice 2d6 and then pick out the art of encounter. Furthermore the GM diced with another d6 to specify the exactly event and then he could choose again between the events itself. Ayways, I thought such a chart-system for a hacker would be nice. Like the magican that is enchating his reagents hackers now could have the same chance to make money during downtime. I will post the results soon.

@Pendaric: I have to admit that you have made a few nice suggestions how PC can earn money with small jobs and take care about their NPC or even add new NPCs during a InGame session. But what I am talking about is to create something analog to the enchating skills of their magic team fellows.

Of course you may inquire how my magicain got his enchanting shop. He leased it. Check prices and availability on S.185, Streetmagic. And sorry, but who is talking bout creating oricalcum? Maybe you meant someone else. The point is that my magcians are making (realtiv) low money with refinding reagents. Raw gold reagents have only a availabilty of 4 and even if adjusting the cost by +20% (market dry) PC pays (only) 12.000 nuyen.gif for one unit of raw gold.
Furthermore they secure their transfers with contracting the groups rigger for monitoring them, and additonal gang-NPCs they have as connections for muscles.

It is not that I couldnt crush them somehow. The GM always finds a solution how to stop a PC from what he/she is doing wink.gif. But furthermore I think why forbide a magican PC to make from time to time some money? Whatfor have the SR developers then published this part of enchating?

What I, and meanwhile some other ppl on this forum smile.gif are looking for, is an alterantive where a capable mudane PC can make some good money between the runs as an alternative to their magician fellows.

Siege
Character maintenance, also known as downtime: my support critters ended up making maglock passkeys and selling or trading them out.

Mages, by virtue of being rare and therefore in high demand, will invariably have the edge in making money - even as a party performer. "Hire a Runner! Entertain your friends! Scare your co-workers! So real you can smell the cordite!"

But this isn't to say other players should be left unattended because a lot of critical things should be happening during the downtime:

1. Training - planning on raising a skill or attribute? Best be prepared to defend the increase. Lay the groundwork for a new skill - "Hey Bob, my character is going to take a course or two at the community college program so I can learn Electronics and Car B/R."

2. Networking - drop enough money at a local shop and make a discreet inquiry for someone who does custom work. Drop money at a strip club and find the ones who do freelance work on the side.

3. Goofy stuff - start a business. Become a regular at a bar. Investigate the owners of your favorite local pizzeria and plant a hook. Earn favors to be recouped later - perhaps not in the Mafioso style, but it'll give you an idea.

4. This is where the maintenance skills really come in handy - help out at the local free clinic. Trade your medical services to gangs and street docs who may not pay in cash, but maybe in trade for other merchandise or future services. This is particularly good if you already have a contact who needs the freebie or an interesting way of making a contact at Joe's Garage on the corner.

If you really want to make the mages think hard and fast about enchanting for nuyen, offer a karma bonus for role-play or imaginative subplots involving characters not actively involved in the daily grind.

-Siege

Edit: But if you're hellbent on making money, the character needs to find job roles suited to their skills that are short-term errands or one-shots. Samurai usually don't have a lot of luck in this area, but they can explore things like:

1. Bounty hunting.
2. Courier
3. Bouncer
4. Private security at street level affairs.
5. Bodyguard

As I said before, the catch is - samurai are a helluva lot more common than wizworms. Which will invariably mean the wiz has more options to earn a lot more cash than the average, run-of-the-mill gun bunny.
yoshikisquall
Does he have any business skills? We ended up having 3 of us taking business management and starting up a few businesses. One has a dojo to teach over weight kids on how to defend themselves, the dojo owner used to have a taxi cab business and I took that over and now ferry the children at a discount to the dojo along with other taxi orders, the other is a dive shop (since that's really the only thing that one character is good at) and the fourth is a bounty hunter sort of one. We'll find someone that looks sorta like you, turn them in, plastic surgery you and get monies for both (the bounty on your head and the cost it took for the team mate to cut you open). Funny part is that my hacker could make so much more money in the matrix or the mages creating orchalicum but because or GM said a similar thing I spun this idea to the group and a few months of saving and here we go. We've also turned the other two members into a rap group and are earning money off of that (those who don't have a job/business that we can fit them into I'll use their skills with the rap business by turning them into their 'body guards' or pyrotechnics for the show).

We don't make the majority of our money off of this (except for the rap group but everyone has their hands in that one so it's split evenly) so our main income is the runs. Even then everyone wants to do that next run, no matter how crazy it is because the GM made sure to make it the main bread.
Nightwalker450
QUOTE
QUOTE
Pay Per Week
17 == 1000 nuyen.gif
12 == 500 nuyen.gif
7 == 200 nuyen.gif
2 == 100 nuyen.gif



What do the numbers before the money mean? In any case thanks again. I'll have to translate this for SR4 as soon you give me the answer LOL.


This was for SR4, the numbers before the amounts are build point costs. You figure the Build points for each of the categories add them together to create a single quality of Day Job. (So individually they don't count towards the +/- 35 Build Point Cap, just after they are all put together).

I meant to come back to this but got side tracked. But for these pay grades I'd put skill requirements. 100 nuyen.gif would be no skill, your McJob. 200 nuyen.gif would be skill of 2, 500 would be skill 4, and 1000 nuyen would be skill 6. Basically you have to have a marketable skill to get above the 100 nuyen.gif per week.
Trickster
QUOTE (ShaunClinton)
My PCs don't pay protection to anyone. There aren't many people who can challenge them who would waste their time with a protection racket.

When our main enemies are Winternight, Aleph Society, the False Face morons, Ex Pacis, the Deus network, Tadashi (greater Shedim incarnation), Tutor, Ares' 68G research, and the Blood Mage Gestalt I tend to agree. Maybe Wednesday and Thursday will need a hefty DocWagon contract after I'm through with them right enough, I'll maybe donate it after the IPO.
Cthulhudreams
I really like the lifestyle funded by downtime activities solution.

Hackers can easily make money, you buy a cheap agent, crack the copy protection, start selling it on the black market, then wash rinse and repeat. If you are desperate, write your own I guess.
Karaden
QUOTE (Nightwalker450)
QUOTE
QUOTE
Pay Per Week
17 == 1000 nuyen.gif
12 == 500 nuyen.gif
7 == 200 nuyen.gif
2 == 100 nuyen.gif



What do the numbers before the money mean? In any case thanks again. I'll have to translate this for SR4 as soon you give me the answer LOL.


This was for SR4, the numbers before the amounts are build point costs. You figure the Build points for each of the categories add them together to create a single quality of Day Job. (So individually they don't count towards the +/- 35 Build Point Cap, just after they are all put together).

I meant to come back to this but got side tracked. But for these pay grades I'd put skill requirements. 100 nuyen.gif would be no skill, your McJob. 200 nuyen.gif would be skill of 2, 500 would be skill 4, and 1000 nuyen would be skill 6. Basically you have to have a marketable skill to get above the 100 nuyen.gif per week.

Maybe it is just me, but those wages seem way way way too low. I mean, this sets highly paid people with massive skill (6 skill is absolutely huge for joe average, and is described as people like Michael Jordan), as being unable to even afford rent on a medium lifestyle, much less enough to buy anything extra. I would think that even Joe Shmoe that works behind the Stuffer Shack counter could afford a low or at the very minimum a squatter lifestyle. I would think 'minimum wage' as far as it went would be about 500 nuyen.gif a month so that the person can at least keep up a low lifestyle. Jobs of up to 2,500 nuyen.gif a week should be obtainable in order to maintain a high lifestyle. And if your looking at something that requires a 6 skill in it, your looking at getting payed enough to think about luxury lifestyle. I know that if I personally had a skill that was 'best of the best' quality, I sure as heck wouldn't be putting it to use for barely enough to be above the poverty line.

Now, I know this is kind of geared towards runners making a bit of extra money, but it is overall absurd. Medium lifestyle should be obtainable by joe average, working a standard 50 hour week (standard in 2070 I think) with normal hours. It should not require one of the best in the field working 60 hour weeks on strict schedual in which they apperently get huge press or something to not even be able to afford medium lifestyle.

Of course, one of the big things with shadowrun is that runners usually run because they -have- to for one reason or another. Because they can't hold down a job, maybe they are on the run from the law or something, but the idea is that shadowrunners are modirately paied high mortality carriers, there is no reason to be a runner if you can hold down a decent well paying job.

Oh, and one other thing to note, is that in order to make that o... um stuff, it requires (apart from everything else such as finding and refining the inital materials) 28 consecutive days of enchanting, durning which the stuff must be tended to every eight hours. If this can't be done, everything is lost, no profit and big money sink. Oversleeping alone could compleatly ruin it, much less having to go out anywhere. I mean, can you imagine hearing this? "Sorry guys, that plan just won't work, I can't be gone more then eight hours." You also can think about the fact that a simple hospital visit could keep him away for more then eight hours, heck, even healing from a small wound could put you out for more then eight hours. I think if they want the huge profits for this, your need to hit them over the head with the eight hour thing.
Fortune
QUOTE (Karaden)
And if your looking at something that requires a 6 skill in it, your looking at getting payed enough to think about luxury lifestyle. I know that if I personally had a skill that was 'best of the best' quality, I sure as heck wouldn't be putting it to use for barely enough to be above the poverty line.

I dunno if that is necessarily true. A 6 or even a 7 in French Fry Cooking ... or even things like Security Procedures or Trid Reporting or other actual job skills are highly unlikely to net you the megabucks needed for a Luxury (or even High) Lifestyle.
hyzmarca
A shadowrunner with 7 in French Fry cooking is the fraggin' Gordon Ramsay of French Frying; with trid reporting he'd be Dan fraggin' Rather; and with Security Procedures he'd be Kevin Costner's character from The Bodyguard, who isn't rich but does get to have sex with Whitney Houston.
Mercer
Whitney Houston before she got all cracked out. I'm just saying, that stock has fallen, but back in the day Bam, Ka-Pow and various other onomatopoeia lifted from the Batman tv show.

Personally, I don't think the system necessarily requires a skill rating to projected annual income mechanic. (Because most jobs probably require a mix of skills, and also because some jobs pay different; a guy who is a pretty good math teacher is going to make less than the guy who's a pretty good garbage man, and so on.) I don't mind pc's covering their lifestyle costs with off-camera side work, but that's mainly because you don't get much from lifestyle-- its largely a role-playing decision. The game focuses on the time the pc's are doing a job; when they're not "in play", what they do is largely a background concern. Its interesting to think about, but its going to take a back seat to the stuff that happens at the table.

Also, I came across this and it made me laugh:
QUOTE
In their book "Snakes in Suits," Paul Babiak, Ph.D. and Robert D. Hare, Ph.D., explain that a surprising number of workplaces employ psychopaths. While psychopaths make up 1 percent of the general population, Babiak and Hare found that 3.5 percent of the executives they worked with "fit the profile of the psychopath." Psychopathic employees are pathological liars who get away with doing little or no work. They charm senior management with their "leadership potential," con co-workers into covering for them, and successfully blame others for their mistakes. If you're the only one who sees what they're up to, you're in a tough spot. Sometimes it’s the whistle-blower who gets fired, not the snake.

Dystopian cyberpunk was right! Corporate executives are crazy!
Karaden
QUOTE (Fortune @ Jan 5 2008, 01:06 AM)
I dunno if that is necessarily true. A 6 or even a 7 in French Fry Cooking ... or even things like Security Procedures or Trid Reporting or other actual job skills are highly unlikely to net you the megabucks needed for a Luxury (or even High) Lifestyle.

I doubt it, someone with a 7 Fry Cooking is likely to have their own cooking show, be developing their own recipies and selling them in cookbook format, or work at/own a large fancy restraunt (that none the less serves fried food).

Someone with a 7 in security procedures is going to be clammored after by corps to help fine tune their defences, own a security consulting company, or otherwise be highly in demand.

These people would have no trouble at all making enough to support a high lifestyle, and may even make luxury without much trouble depending on just how successful they are.

Now, I know that not all skills are created equal, and being a really good teacher won't pay nearly as much as being really good at basketball, but with the competitive environment of the world of 2070, people with excpetional skills are far less likely to be overlooked then they are today (That good teacher is likely to get snatched up by a corp to act as a well paid private tutor).

I think the problem you are having is realising exactly what a skill of 7 in Fry Cooking would mean. Anyone can work at Stuffer Shack dropping frys in the cooker without even having the skill, or maybe if they've been working there a few months, have the skill at a 1. A skill of 7 would mean noone can cook quite like they can. They've learned to prepare the perfectly portioned fries so that they cook the perfect amount. They adjust the temprature to withing .1 degrees of the perfect amount, they know -exactly- how long to hold it under, they've experemented with different oil types for that perfect flavour and blend. They know what spices to add to the fries or oil to enhance it. They also know how to cook just about anything to perfection when given a fryer, and likely have come up with entirely new things for people to fry, and of course provided the recipies to do so with.

*edit* Point there is that someone working in Stuffer Shack won't have a 7 skill. Stuffer Shack wouldn't provide the environment to raise it that high. Heck, you'd be lucky if you could raise it to a 2, there is only so much you can do to improve it under those conditions. Thinking you can get a 7 skill at Stuffer Shack is like saying you can get a 7 Athletics by playing preschoolers using that 5 foot high hoop.
Fortune
QUOTE (Karaden)
I think the problem you are having is realising exactly what a skill of 7 in Fry Cooking would mean.

I don't have a problem understanding the Skill ratings. I think you might be underestimating just how comparatively rare and expensive a Luxury Lifestyle is in the Sixth World.
Wounded Ronin
QUOTE (Fortune)
QUOTE (Karaden @ Jan 6 2008, 02:42 AM)
I think the problem you are having is realising exactly what a skill of 7 in Fry Cooking would mean.

I don't have a problem understanding the Skill ratings. I think you might be underestimating just how comparatively rare and expensive a Luxury Lifestyle is in the Sixth World.

IRON CHEF MCDONALDS!
Karaden
You'll notice that I say they could afford a high not luxury easily. I said that they might be able to afford luxury, based on just how well they can manage their skill and what the exact skill is. But when you get a description of
QUOTE
The “best of the best? Someone whose expertise outranks all others in all of known history.
That is the best in All of known history. I can't imagine these people not getting paid absurd amounts of money. You list something like fry cook, but you know, I don't think there has ever been a fry cook who has obtaind that level of skill. I doubt any of them have over 3 at best, because it just isn't that popular.

I still say your underestimating what a skill of 7 means. A skill of 7 means that people around the world know who you are, know that you are good at this thing. A skill of 7 puts you on par with people like Albert Einstein. Now, I know that SR tends to have a person or two with skill of 7 in something in each group, but that is just how it is, players wanting to be the best. It doesn't mean that a 7 skill is any less impressive though. If that runner with 7 pistols skill wanted, he could go to world class compitions and rank in the top few people there.

But, I'm not going to post any more on this, because it isn't what the thread was about.
Wounded Ronin
As an SR3 person, my only thought is "LOL, Miyamoto Musashi had a skill of 7."
Trickster
QUOTE (Karaden)


I still say your underestimating what a skill of 7 means.  A skill of 7 means that people around the world know who you are, know that you are good at this thing.  A skill of 7 puts you on par with people like Albert Einstein.


But who cares about that guy when I can summon an elemental to cook a much better meal than Gordon Ramsay can possibly conceive. Or for that matter me and my pals go find and bind some force 8 free spirits, make them learn how to cook and set up my spirit cafe with skill 8 and attribute 8 chefs. Cf for theoretical physics. Or computer programming. Or melee combat etc. And then abuse this stupid skill-cap to make pots of cash between runs.
Karaden
QUOTE (Trickster)
QUOTE (Karaden)


I still say your underestimating what a skill of 7 means.  A skill of 7 means that people around the world know who you are, know that you are good at this thing.  A skill of 7 puts you on par with people like Albert Einstein.


But who cares about that guy when I can summon an elemental to cook a much better meal than Gordon Ramsay can possibly conceive. Or for that matter me and my pals go find and bind some force 8 free spirits, make them learn how to cook and set up my spirit cafe with skill 8 and attribute 8 chefs. Cf for theoretical physics. Or computer programming. Or melee combat etc. And then abuse this stupid skill-cap to make pots of cash between runs.

Besides the fact that each dish would likely cost you a service? I don't know. I'm not saying the entire SR system is perfect, espcially when it comes to spirits and their stats and skills.

The fact remains that the book puts forth the idea that someone with a skill of 7 is supposed to be world class in that skill. The idea that someone who is likely one of the best dozen or so in the entire world at what he does couldn't even make enough to keep up a medium lifestyle is simply absurd though.
Fortune
And I think linking Lifestyes and salaries solely to Skill ratings is absurd.
Fortune
QUOTE (Karaden)
I still say your underestimating what a skill of 7 means. A skill of 7 means that people around the world know who you are, know that you are good at this thing. A skill of 7 puts you on par with people like Albert Einstein.

You are aware that there are characters (NPC as well as PC) who have Skill ratings of 10 (Skill of 7 plus Adept Improved Ability or even a Reflex Recorder), aren't you? How do you rate their payscale as compared to those that only have a measly 7 in the same Skill?
Stahlseele
i'd say as long as their demands are reasonable they just get what the want . .
Mercer
On the other hand, a guy with a 7 Skill, or even a 10 skill is worlds better than the guy with the 5 skill, but we're still talking about on average, a couple extra successes. The simple stuff he does a lot better (say, against TN2, but its hard to imagine a TN2 test where world-class skill is really required), the middling stuff he does marginally better (2 or 3 extra successes against a TN4, maybe just 1 against a TN6) and the really, really hard stuff (TN12+) is still fairly luck dependent. The fluff says the difference between a Skill of 5, 7 and 10 is monumental, but mechanically its not that wide a gap.
nezumi
Keep in mind, it's not what you know, but who you know, and if you don't have a SIN, just about no one knows you.
Cthulhudreams
That chart with what the skill ratings mean is just as bizarre as the average stat being 2. More so in a world where me, some guy on the street, can probably be as good a shot as the skill 7 all time greats they list, without training a day ever.

3 (average stat) + 4 points muscle toner + rating 4 active soft, + reflex recorder + smartgun and I have 14 dice, the same as an all time great.

I think the top 0.1% income earners actually have really high values in several linked skills, combined with a reputation that a shadowrunner is never going to have. Would you hand over 20 billion yen to fastjack to run a hedge fund? Pfft. No.

This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.
Dumpshock Forums © 2001-2012